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Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma
July-December 1911

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

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Ada Evening News, July 1, 1911
Two Arrests Made For Bootlegging
Business picked up yesterday in the sheriff's department. Deputy R.E. Duncan captured six barrels of beer at Francis and brought in Charley Baugh, the alleged owner, and put him under bond.
Deputy Cal Bolin made a raid on the road house west of the cement plant and arrested the proprietor, Geo. Bacon, who made bond. Sheriff Mitchell ordered this place, which has borne an unsavory reputation, closed up, and stated to the News that he would keep it closed if he had to make a raid every four hours of the day.
 
*Ada Evening News, July 4, 1911
Deputy Sheriff Duncan left for Haileyville this morning to bring back a man by the name of Dickey, who is charged with having disposed of mortgaged property.
 
Ada Evening News, July 4, 1911
Sheriff Chains Drunks to Trees at Seminole
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Ada Evening News, July 5, 1911
Noted Mankiller Released From Pen
Oklahoma City, July 3 - Clyde Mattox, who is known to have slain four men and has been accused of killing a fifth, and who was famed as an outlaw in the territorial days of Oklahoma, was released from the state prison today and his citizenship restored after he had served a term of 12 years for manslaughter.
The sentence which Mattox was serving was for slaying Lincoln Sweeney, a cattleman, in a saloon brawl in Ponca City. He was paroled by Governor Haskell in March 1908, but in January 1910, he became involved in a fight and his parole was revoked.
Just after Oklahoma had been opened for settlement in 1889, Mattox killed a man, and for this crime he was sentenced to hang. Through the efforts of the prisoner's mother, President Harrison was induced to commute the sentence to life imprisonment. Later, President McKinely pardoned Mattox.
While acting as a deputy United States marshal a few months after his release, Mattox shot and killed a Negro. A short time thereafter, he shot a Negro witness to the first killing. A white man who is said to have seen the second Negro killed, went hunting with Mattox one day, and he has never since been seen.
 
*Ada Evening News, July 11, 1911
ABSTRACT
Deputy Sheriff Townsend of Sapulpa
 
Ada Evening News, July 18, 1911
Tragedy At Roff Monday Evening
Duel Between Oscar Collins And Pate Beauchamp Results Fatally
Collins Instantly Killed
Beauchamp May Die - Six Shooter And Shotgun Were The Weapons Used
About 7 o'clock yesterday evening a tragedy, occurred at Roff that resulted in the death of Oscar Collins and will probably also end in the death of Pate Beauchamp.
From the best information obtainable, it appears that the two men who until a week ago had been the best of friends, had some words over the matter of running the fire team through the streets at a high speed. Ed Bunyard was the driver at that time, and Collins, who was both city marshal and deputy sheriff, thought the run was made for the purpose of irritating him. Bunyard was discharged and Beauchamp, who had been Collins deputy, was put in his place. He was guilty of the same offense, it is said, and Collins considered that it was a scheme to run matters over him.
Yesterday while somewhat under the influence of liquor, he renewed the trouble with Beauchamp and a fight followed, in which Collins was knocked or thrown down. Beauchamp, it is said, grabbed him by the hair and hammered his head against the floor a few times. When they were finally separated, Collins went away swearing that no man could treat him in that manner and live. Everett Deacon took him home and he tried to get his gun but his wife and Deacon would not let him have it. He then went to Jones' hardware store and securing a shotgun, went back to the store of the Brass Hardware Co., where Beauchamp was employed. As he approached the door Beauchamp shot him twice with a pistol. Collins went off a few feet and sat down a moment. Then telling the crowd that he was a dead man anyway, he swore he would kill Beauchamp before he died. He again approached the door and fired a load of shot into his opponent's abdomen, inflicting a wound twice more and Collins fell dead.
All four shots took effect. A bullet passed through each breast, one through his arm, and the other...[SOME IS MISSING HERE THAT NEEDS TO BE RECOPIED]...child. Beauchamp is a single man. Collins was ordinarily a peaceable man, although inclined to be quarrelsome when drinking. He was a man who feared nothing, and of late had done some good work in enforcing the law. At the last city election he led the ticket.
Both men were popular with the entire citizenship of Roff and Sheriff Mitchell states that the tragedy is deeply regretted by all.
When news of the trouble reached Ada Sheriff Mitchell, Deputy R.E. Duncan and County Attorney Wimbish at once left for Roff, returning this morning.
 
Ada Evening News, July 21, 1911
Two Arrests For Horse Theft
Last night Deputy Carl Bolin came in from Coalgate with John and Treance Popejoy, wanted for the theft of horses from Gregg & Chapman and Tom Bennett about three weeks ago. Since the theft Gregg & Chapman have followed the trail from here all through several counties east of this section finally overtaking them at Coalgate. At the same time an officer from Seminole county was on their trail and he arrested them a few minutes before Sheriff Murphy ran across them. However, he turned them over to the Pontotoc County officers and they are now in jail.
 
Ada Evening News, July 21, 1911
A Woman Joint Smasher Appointed
Oklahoma City, July 21 - Miss Addie Caldwell of Shawnee who was commissioned as a deputy enforcement officer Thursday, is the first woman to be appointed to that position, and the first legalized woman "saloon smasher" in Oklahoma. Under authority of the Commission issued to her, she has the right to demolish liquor and bar fixtures and to arrest any and all violators of the law.
The commission is one which would have delighted the heart of the late Carrie Nation, although Mrs. Caldwell is not in any sense a follower of Mrs. Nation or disposed to employ her methods. She is an elderly woman of great determination and much good common sense, who has done a good work in Shawnee as manager of the Provident Association there.
Her especial purpose in securing this commission is to help in closing up the rooming houses at Shawnee, in which many boys and girls are said to be led astray and concerning which much complaint has been made to the officers at Shawnee. It is claimed that intoxicating liquors are kept at practically all of these places and that a special enforcement officer can find much work to do in that connection.
Mrs. Caldwell is doing this work without compensation, further than that which she already received, and is going into it primarily for the purpose of carrying out more fully the work which she is already engaged.
 
Ada Evening News, August 7, 1911
The Murder of William B. Gray
The nude and decomposed body of William Gray, 59, of Moller, was found Saturday a mile west of Hart by boys hunting for plums. It was one of the foulest crimes ever committed in Pontotoc County.
Frank Edwards was arrested late Saturday at Pauls Valley and is lodged at the Ada Jail. A preliminary hearing has been set for Thursday morning in Justice Brown's court with County Attorney Wimbish, prosecutor, and R. G. Roland, Attorney for defense (court appointed).
Gray's body was found near the road in a thicket about a mile west of Hart. In another place was found a trunk, and another a tent with blood on it. A posse led by Deputy Eli Morris, Bill Eaves, W. C. Blackburn, Frank BArnett, and one other man tracked Edwards toward Pauls Valley. The sheriff at Pauls Valley had been notified by telephone and had Edwards in custody when the posse arrived. Edwards had sold Gray's wagon and team of mules to Gibson Bros., mule dealers, for $175, and was buying a saddle and having Gray's black horse shod when he was arrested. At first Edwards gave the name of Fred Smith, but later confessed it was Frank Edwards. When arrested Edwards had about $20 in his pockets.
Edwards had little to say until Sunday morning when he called for Deputy Morris and told this story: He said that he met up with Gray at Owens Ferry on the Red River and had been traveling with him. He said they camped Wednesday night between Hickory and Roff. He said that on Thursday morning a man named Fred McFarland rode up with a Winchester, ordered him out of the wagon and shot Gray in the back of the head. He said the man then commanded him to go and sell Gray's belongings and be prepared to divide the money and said there were three more men hidden in the brush. Nevertheless, Edwards hauled the body around all day just going around in circles.
He drove into Hart late Thursday night and dumped the body early Friday morning. He said Gray's clothes came off as he was being dragged.
William Gray had been living in Sterling City, Tex, for three or four years although he had been back to visit and attend the funeral of his brother about two years ago. He was moving back to Moller to stay. Gray was a man who tended strictly to his own business and his reputation was the best. He never married. Edwards is well known in Pontotoc County. His family lived at Center at one time. He is 31 years old.
At his preliminary hearing, Edwards was bound over for trial set for Aug 14. Defense asked for, and was granted, a change of venue to Wewoka, Judge McKeown presiding. On the 14th Edwards said he was too sick to appear. Trial began on the 15th with the courtroom packed to suffocation and spectators crowding the doors and windows. the jury went out at 7:00 PM and returned at 2:30 OM the next day with a guilty verdict and asked for the death penalty. The Ada news headline read "Edwards Must Hang"
He was sentenced to life imprisonment. the defense asked for a new trial on the grounds that new evidence had turned up. It said that Edwards had once.........
 
Ada Evening News, August 17, 1911
Scribner Trial Is Held Up
John And Frank Scribner Disappear - Edwards Case On Trial
Bud Gregg returned from Wewoka this morning and brought back the very startling news that sometime yesterday morning John and Frank Scribner, important witnesses in the Dan Scribner case, had suddenly disappeared, leaving no trace behind them. As a result the trial is halted for the time being while diligent search is being made throughout the state for the two men. Some think they escaped to Texas, but that hardly seems possible. The trial was proceeding rapidly, and no one missed the Scribners until they were called to go on the stand about 3 o'clock in the afternoon. A search of the town failed to disclose them and the judge announced that the trial would go no farther until the two are brought back. The jury was placed under an officer and will so remain for the present.
Mr. Gregg states that Bob Wimbish is making a case as strong or evening stronger than the first trial.
Advices from Wewoka received by the News about noon today stated that the Edwards case went to trial this morning. By noon each side had exhausted four challenges in the selection of the jury, and the list would soon be complete. Edwards has about recovered and can walk to and from the court room.
It was also stated that no trace of the two Scribners had been found.
 
Ada Evening News, August 28, 1911
John And Frank Scribner Return
John and Frank Scribner, who suddenly decamped during the progress of the trial of Dan Scribner at Wewoka, came in yesterday and surrendered. They were taken to Wewoka by Deputy Sheriff Duncan and lodged in jail to await a review of their case by Judge McKeown. The maximum penalty for contempt of court is a fine of $100 and ten days in jail.
These much wanted witnesses have been sojourning in Arkansas since their disappearance about ten days ago.
 
Ada Evening News, September 1, 1911
Night Riders Arrested
Three Farmers of Maxwell Accused By Young Man Of Brutal Treatment
Has Pontotoc county been the scene of a raid by Night Riders?
If a story told by J.A. Simmons to the officers is substantiated, it would seem that something of the kind has occurred. Acting on information given, Deputy Sheriff Cal Bolin and Constable W.B. Adair went to Maxwell yesterday and arrested Zepha and Homer Hamm and Frank Phillips.
According to the statement of Simmons, he and another young man were camped on his father's place eight miles northwest of Maxwell. A few nights ago they were visited by six or eight masked men. Simmons' companion escaped and has not been located since. Simmons says he was dragged barefooted through briars and several patches of bull nettles and finally to a deserted cabin with no floor. Here he was stretched across a sleeper and severely handled.
The "riders" accused him of stealing melons from Phillips. Simmons claimed to have recognized the three who were arrested while they were striking matches in their hunt for patches of bull nettles through which to drive him. He was considerably worse for his experience when he came to town to report the occurrence.
The three accused men are farmers living in the neighborhood where the trouble occurred. So far as known, they have always borne a good reputation. They claim to know nothing whatever about the case, declaring themselves much surprised that they were arrested on such a charge.
Later - W.W. Phillips, father of Frank Phillips, was brought in today also charged with being a participant in the assault on Simmons. The four were arraigned before Justice Brown who fixed their bonds at $1,500 each. In default of this they were committed to jail.
 
Ada Evening News, September 1, 1911
Muskogee Officers Break Safe To Find Booze
Muskogee, Okla., Sept. 1 - Safe breakers in the persons of Officers Smalley and Will Tulk are now at work upon the safe of the Regal drug store, 221 North Third street. It is a booze raid and the incriminating wet goods are expected to be found in the steel receptacle. If such is the case it is a solid place for a plant and Officer Tulk, who is wielding the cold chisel, has his work set out for him. A search warrant was issued for the place but the proprietors refused to open the safe. Another search warrant was procured covering the contents of the safe and admittance again refused. As a result, the officers have adopted the yegg method for opening it. This place has been under surveillance of the officers and many attempts have been made to obtain the necessary evidence, but always to no purpose. The officers think they have located the plant this time and will make a thorough job of it if it takes all day.
 
Ada Evening News, September 2, 1911
Scribners Get $50 And 10 Days
A letter from Wewoka today states that Judge McKeown assessed a fine of $50 and a term of ten days in jail against John and Frank Scribner on account of their disappearance from Wewoka during the trail of the Dan Scribner case.
 
Edwards And Scribner Will Be Returned To Wewoka Monday
Frank Edwards and Dan Scribner will be taken back to Wewoka Monday where Judge McKeown will pass on the motions for new trials for them. The prevailing opinion is that neither will be granted another hearing but that sentence will be passed. It is said that the attorneys for Scribner will attempt to secure a stay of sentence pending an appeal.
Edwards has fully recovered from the effects of the big dose of disinfectant he swallowed the morning he was taken to Wewoka for trial, and his appetite has fully returned.
 
Ada Evening News, September 5, 1911
Burglar Attempts House Of Chief
Saturday night some burglar either very green or else exceedingly bold, attempted to enter the home of Chief Hounshell. He was trying to unlatch the screen of the window in the room occupied by Steve Hounshell, son of the chief. Steve happened to wake up and watched the fellow several minutes. Then when he moved off a short distance from the house Steve slipped into his father's room and told him of the intruder's presence. Mr. Hounshell grabbed a shotgun and went in search of the burglar, but he had evidently heard Steve get up and had already disappeared.
 
Ada Evening News, September 5, 1911
Scribner Is Sentenced To The Pen
Judge McKeown Overrules Motion For New Trial - Will Be Taken To McAlester At Once
This morning at Wewoka, Judge McKeown overruled the motion for a new trial of the Dan Scribner case, and sentenced him to life imprisonment for the murder of Zeke Putnam, city marshal of Allen, over two years ago.
His attorneys gave notice of appeal, but pending action of the higher court, it is probable that Scribner will be taken to McAlester and be placed in the penitentiary.
 
Ada Evening News, September 15, 1911
Making Trouble For "Pussyfoot" Johnson
Washington, D.C., Sept. 15 - William E. "Pussyfoot" Johnson head of the government suppressors of the liquor traffic among the Indians of this country is at present in Washington in answer to a summons from Acting Secretary of the Interior Adams to explain, it is rumored, why he has at times failed to carry out the orders of the department. It is said that Johnson has been over zealous in the discharge of his duties and it is rumored that unless he can satisfactorily explain his actions to the department, he will be severely reprimanded, if not discharged from the service.
Johnson, who was a terror to bootleggers and drinking citizens generally during territorial days in Oklahoma still wears the smile that will not come off and has just published a 250-page book on "The Federal government and the Liquor Traffic," which is chuck full of information regarding the liquor traffic among the American Indians since the inception of the government down to the present day.
 
Ada Evening News, September 16, 1911
Ed Brents, who is doing duty in the Northwest as special enforcement officer, arrived this morning on a visit to his family.
 
Ada Evening News, September 16, 1911
Deputy Sheriff R.E. Duncan was a passenger to Roff this morning.
 
Ada Evening News, September 16, 1911
Deputy Joe Foster was here Wednesday morning and took seven colored "gemmen" out on a road to work out a fine for beating their board bill. The crew are now working two miles west of Moller - Stonewall News.
 
Ada Evening News, September 18, 1911
"Pussyfoot" Johnson Resigns
Washington, Sept. 18 - William E. Johnson, of New York, the chief suppressor of the illicit liquor traffic among the reservation Indians of the United States, who lead a rather strenuous career in Indian Territory just prior to Oklahoma's admission as a state, the mention of whose name struck terror to the hearts of the bootleggers has tendered his resignation to Acting Secretary of the Interior Adams, effective Oct. 1. H.F. Coggeshell of New York, Johnson's chief deputy, has been named as his successor. Johnson, who is known in Oklahoma as "Pussyfoot", has operated in all parts of the world.
 
Ada Evening News, September 19, 1911
The Passing of Pussyfoot
The liquor interests of the United States will breath a big sigh of relief; Pussyfoot Johnson, the most inveterate foe illicit liquor dealers ever had, has resigned and the bootleggers of the Indian reservations in the western states hope to have a little peace. In a conversation with a representative of the News, Special Officer Ed Brents confirms the statement of the daily press that Johnson lost out with his superiors because of his zeal in carrying out his instructions. In his smashing he never showed any favors and as a result he naturally came into collision with men who had a pull with the Washington crew. For instance, one man in the office of the Attorney General had also been attorney for the National Wine Growers Association. These Washington men have made life as uncomfortable for Johnson as possible, and he has quit the job. Mr. Brents expresses regret that Johnson will leave the service for, as he puts it, there will never be another like him.
 
Ada Evening News, September 19, 1911
Enforcement Officer Has No Sap
Special Officer Ed Brents is spending two weeks with his family and getting a little breathing spell from his strenuous labor of chasing bootleggers who insist on plying their trade on the Indian reservations of the northwest. One of his recent exploits was to put fifty-three dispensers of wet goods in jail at Reno, Nevada, fifty-two of whom entered pleas of guilty.
It has been only a short time since ex-Mayor Brenton of Des Moines, Ia., was raided and his saloon on a South Dakota reservation confiscated and Brenton himself sent to the pen for a term of three years. An ex-sheriff was in Miner county, South Dakota, was also sent up for a term. About the most strenuous time Mr. Brents ever had was with a whole town in Minnesota about a year ago, where he gathered in and shipped out nine cars of booze besides jailing a whole bunch of illegal sellers.
 
Ada Evening News, October 3, 1911
Mrs. Cal Bolin Dead
About 7:30 last evening, Mrs. Cal Bolin, wife of the chief deputy sheriff, passed away after a long illness. The remains were taken to Frisco today for interment. The News regrets not being in possession of sufficient data to give a more extended mention of Mrs. Bolin, but will try to secure it at once. The sincerest sympathy of the entire county goes out to Mr. Bolin in his loss, for he and his family have friends in every section.
 
Ada Evening News, October 17, 1911
Pioneer Scout Dies
Oberlin, Kas., Oct. 16 - W.D. (Bill) Street, a pioneer of Kansas, died here today after a stroke of apoplexy. He was a scout and guide with Gen. Custer and knew "Wild Bill" Hickock in his most ferocious days and hunted with Buffalo Bill. Street was commissioned by Maj. Mauck of the Fourth United States Cavalry who was pursuing Chief Dull Knife and his band of Cheyennes, after the raid and massacre in Sept. 1878, to carry dispatches from the Holstein Ranch to Fort Ogallala, Neb., 135 miles, thus giving to the world the news of depredation of the Indians in the last massacre that occurred on the Kansas plains. Mr. Street served Decatur County in the legislature several terms and was once speaker of the Kansas house of representatives.
 
Ada Evening News, October 21, 1911
Smashing Booze
W.R. Bradon, special enforcement officer, has not been doing much talking, but somehow he is getting next to quite a little booze. On the giant lot north of A.K. Thornton's implement store, is a pile of broken glass fragments of bottles that once contained the liquid joy. He admits to having smashed forty-eight pints yesterday and two gallons today, although he would not say just where it came from.
 
Ada Evening News, October 31, 1911
Brandon Still Smashing Booze
W.R. Brandon, special enforcement officer, is still busy hunting and smashing bottles of joy water. Yesterday and today he has broken sixteen quarts of alcohol, creating consternation among the ranks of the thirsty.
 
Ada Evening News, November 3, 1911
Good Road's Movement
Enforcement Officers Take Notice:
We want the names of all the bootleggers in the State of Oklahoma to clear the right-of-way for a public highway across the state.
W.R. Brandon
Special Enforcement Officer
 
Ada Evening News, November 4, 1911
Today Deputy Sheriff Chandler of Stonewall brought in George and Olin Bozarth and O.E. Chestnutt, charged with disturbing religious worship. Olin Bozarth entered a plea of guilty, and was given a fine, with which costs footed up about $31. The other two made bond and will fight their cases.
 
Ada Evening News, November 20, 1911
Frank Scribner Disappears
This morning when the Frank Scribner murder case was called, the defendant did not put in his appearance, and it was afterward learned that he had not been seen for two weeks. The court ordered the $5,000 bond forfeited, and an alias warrant issued for him.
Scribner was under indictment for being accessory to the murder of his wife near Stonewall nearly three years ago. An assassin fired on her through the window, and shortly afterwards her husband and his brothers were indicted for the killing.
 
Ada Evening News, November 20, 1911
Burglars At Roff
Rob Dowdy Store And Attempt To Enter That Of Pannell Bros.
Sunday night burglars broke into the stores of Robert Dowdy and Pannell Bros. of Roff.
At the first named they secured $10 in cash and jewelry to the amount of $100 or more.
At the Pannell store they broke the windows both in front and in the rear of the building. One of the proprietors was sleeping in the second story, and hastened down the back way. He saw a man trying to crawl in through the window and took a few shots at him, but he made his escape. Nothing had been molested in the store.
The burglars were trailed for some distance down the railroad track, but have not been captured.
Mr. Dowdy seems particularly unfortunate, this being the third time his store has been burglarized. Only three or four months ago a thief slipped in and made away with $86.
 
Ada Evening News, November 21, 1911
District Court Gets Day Off
District court is taking a layoff as a result of another forfeited bond and the absence of witnesses in another case. As it was expected that the Frank Scribner case would occupy the attention of the court for two or three days, the docket for Tuesday was purposely made light. However, when Scribner disappeared, the court found itself with plenty of time to look after others.
When the Noah Collins horse stealing case was called this morning, the defendant failed to show up, and his bond of $500 was declared forfeited. Several important witnesses in the Lous Perlette burglary case from Steedman being absent, there was nothing to do except issue attachments for these and adjourn court until Wednesday morning.
Late Monday afternoon, the jury that tried J.W. Wilson on a charge of burglarizing the Bruner store some weeks ago returned a verdict of not guilty, the evidence against him being rather weak.
 
Ada Evening News, December 2, 1911
Equal To Pussyfoot Johnson
Yesterday W.R. Brandon, special enforcement officer, smashed 113 bottles of booze of various sizes, making a new record in that line.
 
Ada Evening News, December 5, 1911
Just to see how things are kept in the drug stores of Ada, W.R. Brandon, special enforcement officer in company with Constables Adair and Foster, made a round Monday and says that if every other place in the city and state was as free from booze as the drug stores, he would be out of a job right now, for they found not a trace of anything stronger than blackberry cordial anywhere.
 
Ada Evening News, December 6, 1911
Cal Bolin went to Paul's Valley yesterday afternoon having in charge Felix Powell, who was recently sentenced to two years in the reform school
 
Ada Evening News, December 13, 1911
Sol Moss and John Scribner were in from their farms this morning. Sol says he lacks only about two bales of having his cotton crop out.

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