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Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma
January-December 1910

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

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Ada Evening News, January 12, 1910
Wholesale Arrests
U.S. Marshal Ed Brents Of Ada Sweeps Coalgate Clear Of Bootleggers And Puts Lid On
The News is late in saying so, but it is true nevertheless, that Ed Brents spent a few days in Coalgate last week and as a result of this visit, he on Saturday last, arrested near a dozen men, on the charge of unlawfully disposing of intoxicants, and in all, docketed about 24 cases for the state and landed several of the violators in the country jail. Among those who were apprehended was a wholesaler from Denison who happened to be in the city on a business errand.
It is said that this is the first cleaning out Coalgate has enjoyed recently and that the officers whose intentions it seems are good have been threatened and intimidated until they became particularly inactive in the enforcement of the liquor laws.
Brents will continue in aiding in the enforcement of the prohibition laws in Oklahoma, and other localities may soon receive his visiting card.
 
Ada Evening News, February 12, 1910
26 Offenders Are Stuck At Coalgate
Bootleggers Convicted In Coal County
If They Didn't Please Guilty The Jury Convicted Them - Special Officer Brents Returns
Special Officer T.E. Brents has returned to the city from Coalgate after giving that city the most thorough cleaning up it has had for a long time.
Brents went to Coalgate on January 5 and for three days arrested bootleggers right and left. Everybody who was engaged in the booze business was taken in and information filed against him.
Twenty-Six Cases
All told there were twenty-six offenders and all who were tried before a jury were convicted. The others plead guilty and were given fines ranging from $100 and thirty days in jail to $500 and thirty days in jail. The opinion around Coalgate now is that the booze business in on the bum and bond timber is scarce.
Crawled Under Floor
There are several perjury cases in the court at Stonewall and one of these fellows who would swear falsely as readily as truthfully was in the courtroom when Officer Brents was filing an information against him. He got wise and hiked. A search was made for him and he was found under a house. He was pulled out and will soon be given what is coming to him.
Mrs. Frank Word is reported as recovering from a severe attack of the grip.
 
Ada Evening News, March 1, 1910
Chas. Scribner was excused from jury duty this morning and returned to Stonewall owing to illness in his family.
 
Ada Evening News, April 29, 1910
Walter Lane Captured By Haskell Co. Deputy
Deputy Blair of Haskell county came here in pursuit of a horse thief and accidentally ran across and captured Walter Lane who is wanted in Haskell county for several offenses.
 
[No May abstracts]
 
Ada Evening News, June 7, 1910
Woman Shoots Her Husband
Who Had Stabbed Her Twice - Trouble Originated In Divorce Suit
Guthrie, Okla., June 6 - To protect herself from her husband, who was lying wait to kill her and who stabbed her twice before she could break away from him, Mrs. Fannie Baker fired three shots from a thirty-eight caliber revolver at her husband, Fleming C. Baker at 8 o'clock Monday morning.
Two of the shots took effect, one in the right leg near the body and the other in the left side. The man was taken to the Methodist Hospital, where attending physicians say he has a chance to recover. Mrs. Baker was taken to the Metropolitan hotel in a serious condition. She is extremely nervous as a result of her wounds and of the excitement incident to the affair....[MORE AOL SHUT DOWN BEFORE I COULD FINISH]
 
Ada Evening News, June 29, 1910
"Madhouse" Raided At Keifer, Oklahoma
One Man Shot And Seriously Wounded In Resisting Arrest
Keifer, June 28 - Lee Wilder, city marshal, shot and seriously wounded Lee Hailey as a result of a raid on a joint here known as the "Madhouse" Sunday evening. The shooting occurred about 7:30 and Hailey was taken to a Tulsa hospital. The town is divided into factions, the prohibition and the whiskey element, and many conflicting stories of the affair have been in circulation.
Constable C.B. Lake, who was a member of the posse, today gave his version of the affair. City Marshal Wilder, Constable Lake and Marshall Wilder's father, who had been sworn in as a deputy by the constable, raided the "Madhouse", a notorious resort, Sunday evening, and found several men gambling. The gambling paraphernalia was destroyed and a short time later Orcutt, or "Whirie", as he is better known, was arrested.
As the officers were taken him along the street they were stopped by Lee Hailey, proprietor of the "Madhouse" who demanded to know what the officers were going to do with him. A quarrel ensued and Hailey pulled his gun and was immediately covered by Constable Lake, who told him to drop it. Hailey dropped the muzzle of the gun to the sidewalk and backed into the door of a nearby joint. Lake, thinking he was going to make a dash through the house, ran along the building, when Hailey fired at Wilder's father. Wilder immediately responded with a shot that entered Hailey's upper jaw, knocked out several teeth, and broke the lower jaw, inflicting a serious wound that may prove fatal.
Hailey was taken to Grosshart sanitarium of this place. Information was given out last night to the effect that the wounded man was getting along nicely and is in a way for early recovery.
 
[No July abstracts]
 
Ada Evening News, August 13, 1910
T.E. Brents, special deputy United States marshal for the Indian reservation in the north and northwest, is at home on a few days vacation.
 
Ada Evening News, August 13, 1910
Lee McCoy, policeman of Ardmore, who has been in the city a few days, left this morning for his home.
 
Ada Evening News, August 17, 1910
Ed Brents, U.S. special officer, will leave tomorrow for Helena, Montana.
 
Ada Evening News, August 17, 1910
Geo. V. West Resigns As Police Chief
New Chief Elected To Fill Unexpired Term - New Councilman For Third Ward
At a meeting of the city council this afternoon the resignation of Geo. V. West as chief of police was accepted and R.N. Hounshell was chosen to fill the unexpired term. T.H. Clark of Third street was elected councilman for the third ward to succeed Geo. V. West, resigned.
The new chief of police says he will enforce the law to the best of his ability and if there is any law the people do not wish enforced it had better be taken off the books. That was in effect his speech of acceptance this afternoon and the council said it was a good one.
 
Ada Evening News, August 27, 1910
Gets On A Spree; Shoots Things Up
Ivey Wright, who has a reputation of being connected with booze a good deal who a few days ago was released from jail where he had been serving a sentence for selling whiskey and who started off on the road to reformation for the teenth time, was temporarily reformed this afternoon. It happened that he got drunk again, armed himself, got in his own house, and began to shoot things up. Walter Goyne demanded a surrender; Wright refused and made as if he would use a gun; Goyne was the quicker and knocked Wright down with his gun. Now Ivey is coming to himself in the city jail.
 
Ada Evening News, August 27, 1910
Bad Man In Town
Last Friday our city was honored by the presence of Tom Starr, one of the remnants of the Starr gang, which infested the Chickasaw country in the early days. Starr was arrested at Sasakwa on the Fourth of July for disorderly conduct and put in the town cooler. He succeeded in breaking the lock and escaping, together with another inmate. He was shortly afterward recaptured and given 30 days on the county road gang. Last week, during the temporary absence of the guard, he beat a trusty nearly to death and got away, arriving in Francis Friday. In some strange and unaccountable manner he secured some intoxicating liquor and grew braver and braver until he considered himself valiant enough to take charge of the town and run it according to his ideas of municipal government. He had in some way become possessed of two revolvers, but laid them aside while he went to the City Meat Market to get a butcher knife which he needed in his business. He got the knife, but about this time Marshall[sic] Bob Duncan took a hand in the game and requested Tom to give up the knife. Thomas refused and he and Bob immediately mixed. The bad man was quickly overpowered, but not until he had made two or three thrusts with the knife and Bob received two flesh wounds on the hand. Deputy Marshal Lance arrived and the prisoner, still fighting, was landed in jail, where he amused himself by battering all the furniture into kindling wood. Mr. Duncan took him to Wewoka Sunday and turned him over to the authorities of Seminole County, who were very glad to get hold of him again. His little holiday will add about six months to his sentence.
Starr, like most sons of outlaws, is a degenerate. He has none of the intelligent deviltry and cunning of his notorious father. When sober he is a harmless, loafing fellow, but when he gets a pint or two of "mule" in his carcass he becomes a dangerous maniac. A term at McAlester is what he needs and it is only a question of time before he get it - Francis Wigwam.
 
Ada Evening News, August 28, 1910
Bob Cummings
Who died last Friday and was buried at Lone Grove, about fifteen miles west of Ardmore. Bob was for a long time deputy U.S. marshal here under Ed Brents. He has been in bad health for several months, leaving here about six weeks ago to recuperate.
 
Ada Evening News, August 28, 1910
Mrs. T.E. Brents says that her husband was where it snowed last Wednesday, being in Montana.
 
Ada Evening News, September 13, 1910
Was A Scout Under Custer
Hobart, Okla Sept 12 - One of the interesting visitors at the county fair here was Philip Block, an intermarried Cheyenne Indian, who was for fifty years a government scout and, at the age of 75 years, is still strong and hearty. He lives at Watonga. In 1865, Block hunted buffalo on the spot where Hobart now stands. During an expedition he was arrested by Lone Wolf, chief of the Kiowas, and held prisoner in the Wichita Mountains for four days. Block was with Reno at the time of the Custer massacre and was the first to reach General Custer after the battle. He pulled three arrows from the dead officer's body. These he retains as momentos of those days. Forty-five years ago Block and his partner were ambushed by the redskins and the other man killed. Block still carries the dead man's watch.
 
*Ada Evening News, September 15, 1910
Chief Hounshell After the Joints
Yesterday Chief Hounshell had an intimation that there was a deposit of wet goods kept in storage in the rear of the building occupied by Harvey Luther's Grocery Store. He made a search but found that everything had been removed. He was told, however, that for some time that had been a deposit used by local jointists and that often there were several barrels of beer and whiskey on hand. As the rear part of the building was not rented by Luther, he protested to the chief that the search might do him some damage, but all the consolation given him was the advise to rent it all and then he could keep it out. The chief has looked into other suspicious places, but the jointists seem to have hidden their stuff out pretty well or else sold it all.
 
*Ada Evening News, September 15, 1910
Chief Gets Warning
This morning Chief Hounsell received two cards through the mail giving him a little advice. One reads "Jest keep Cool." The other says "The man who attends to his own business has a steady job." Whether these were mailed by a practical joker or by some one who thinks to warn the chief to keep his hands off, is not known, but if it is from the last named the chief says he does not owe his job to them and they will have to expect all that is coming to them.
 
*Ada Evening News, September 15, 1910
Confederate Veterans' Day
Dallas, TX Sept 14 - Confederate Veteran's Day at the twenty-fifth annual meeting of the state fair of Texas which begins in this city October 15, and continues sixteen days, is Tuesday October 18. Veterans, sons and daughters, are to assemble in convention hall for a special program. General W.L. Cabell of Dallas is assisting the management in preparations. It is the wish of Gen day afternoon from Brighton, Tennessee memories and traditions of the Lost Cause attend the fair on Oct. 18.
 
Ada Evening News, October 13, 1910
Loss Hart, ex-deputy United States marshal, was over from Stratford yesterday.
 
Ada Evening News, October 13, 1910
Joe Hardin plead guilty to drunkenness and paid a fine and cost amounting to $32.50 yesterday. The arrest was made by Deputy John Kitchens.
 
Ada Evening News, October 17, 1910
Death Penalty For Washmood
Convicted Of Killing Ben Collins - Judge Sets Verdict Aside
Ardmore, Ok., Oct. 16 - The jury in the A. Washmood famous murder case filed into open court yesterday and handed their verdict to Judge Huston, who instructed the clerk to receive and file the same; thereupon the verdict was read as follows: "We, the jury, duly empaneled[sic] and sworn in the above entitled cause, do upon our oaths find the defendant, A. Washmood, guilty, as charged in the fourth county of the indictment...C.H. Davenport, Foreman".
Judge McGinnis, leading counsel for the defendant requested that the court have the jury polled: each juror's name was called, one at a time, and the following question and answers thereto were put to each juror:
Is that your verdict? Yes, sir.
Are you still satisfied with it? Yes sir.
This verdict carries with it the death penalty.
Judge McGinnis, who has made a most excellent defense of his client, and who has shown extraordinary skill and ability as a good criminal lawyer, immediately filed a motion for a new trial, and said motion was heard and acted upon before Judge Huston left for his Guthrie home yesterday afternoon and in the face of this verdict of the jury, Judge Huston by his decision has given Washmood another chance to be heard in court.
When the reporter called upon County Attorney Mathers, immediately after hearing that Judge Huston had set the verdict of the jury aside in the Washmood case, Mr. Mathers said: "We had twelve representative men on that jury; they were men of intelligence, and who desired to see the law enforced; they saw every witness, listened patiently to all the testimony, and after going to their rooms offered up a prayer to God to direct their conscience to do the right thing. These men said Washmood should hang. Then for a judge to insult their intelligence and the people of my county by setting that verdict aside, before the ink has dried upon the paper, is more than I can stand. It is very little satisfaction to the law-abiding people. It is little encouragement for the state counsel, who are arriving to protect the human lives of our citizenship. I think it an outrage upon our people. Just such action is what caused the honest citizens of Ada to lynch the notorious Jim Miller, the partner of Washmood. There was not an error in the case, and the court so said; but said because the testimony was not sufficient to support a verdict, he would set the verdict aside.
"I am going to try this man again, just as soon as I finish the rest of the docket. We can hang him again before an honest jury just like we did this time. The jury did their duty, we did ours."
This killing occurred August 1, 1906 as Ben Collins, a deputy United States marshal, had ridden up to his gate. Three men, concealed behind the brush, shot Mr. Collins eight different times, some using shot guns[sic], loaded with buckshot, some with Winchesters and others with pistols. Collins fell from his horse, in sight of his wife, dead. He was able to draw his gun, and fire a shot as he fell. It was after dark, and the state had to rely upon circumstances alone for a conviction. But the circumstances were so convincing and well developed that the path of the jury was made easy.
Washmood plead an alibi, that is, he was not there at the time of the killing.
The theory of the state was that Port Pruitt employed J.B. Miller and A. Washmood, assisted by another brother, Clint Pruitt, to do the killing because Ben Collins, as deputy marshal was attempting to arrest Port Pruitt in 1904, near Orr, shot Port Pruitt, from the effects of which he never recovered. Port Pruitt is dead; Clint Pruitt was killed at Cornish last summer; Dan Sie, also indicted, was killed, J.B. Miller was hung by a mob at Ada. Now an honest jury of Carter county has said Washmood must die.
 
Ada Evening News, October 24, 1910
Two Killed And Two Wounded
Fights In Seminole County Result Fatally
Officer Is Killed
Bad Whisky Getting In Its Work On Little River
Wewoka, Okla., Oct. 23 - Two were killed and two others, one a woman, wounded in pistol fights among the mixed Indians and Negroes in the southern part of Seminole county Saturday night and Sunday.
The first fight occurred late Saturday night at a dance attended by Negroes and half-breed Indians and Negroes[sic] at Little River, in the south central portion of Seminole county. This fight arose over a brawl which started on account of a Negro woman.
Warren Davis was killed. Jewell Davis, his sister, wounded in the leg, and Randolph Cudjo wounded in the leg. Cudjo's leg was broken.
The second fight occurred Sunday while Davis' father was in Wewoka buying a coffin. John Marshall shot and killed John Dennis, one of the most influential Negroes in the county. Dennis was a federal deputy constable before statehood. Marshall was arrested. The cause of the fight is not known.
In connection with the first fight, T.H. Williams, who lives in the Little Creek country, came to Wewoka Sunday and swore to a complaint charging Warren Davis with the shooting of the others. Warren Davis is no relation to the dead man.
The Little River section is famous all over the county as the toughest portion. There is a saying among the Negroes that "when a Little Creek Negro shows up the rest take to the bushes."
Williams declared further that on account of a universal custom in the Little Creek country for every one who was physically able to stand the weight of a pistol to carry one. He said the recent bad blood and high state of feeling among the Negroes in that section was partly accounted for by quantities of bad whisky which had been shipped into the section. He absolutely refused to say who he believed was responsible for shipping it in. Williams is a republican.
Williams declared further that on account of the rowdyism that prevailed in that neighborhood, it was impossible to hold schools or church services. Such a gathering always broke up in a fight, he said.
 
Ada Evening News, October 31, 1910
ABSTRACT
mentions Chris Madsen office deputy at Guthrie will be executive officer present at term of court.
 
Ada Evening News, November 26, 1910
"Pussyfoot" May Come Back
Oklahoma City, Okla., Nov. 25 - Dr. E.C. Dinwiddle of Washington who figured conspicuously in the statehood prohibition campaign while here in the interest of the National Inter-Church Temperance Federation said that the federation had appealed to the United States government to send W.E. Johnson back to Oklahoma from Oregon to assist in enforcing the prohibition law. Johnson was the most effective terror to the bootleggers of Indian Territory during Territorial days. His efforts are declared to be wanted in connection with the enforcement of law on Indian reservations.
 
Ada Evening News, December 3, 1910
Abernathy Will Answer Charges
Guthrie, Okla., Dec. 2 - John R. Abernathy, wolf catcher and U.S. Marshal, left yesterday for Washington, called by the Department of Justice relative to charges, which have recently been investigated here by Inspector Fishman of that department. It is said today he will tender his resignation to President Taft upon his arrival. He was appointed by President Roosevelt because of his wolf-catching stunts and later reappointed by him, having about two years yet to serve. Among the Republicans whose names are mentioned as his successor are ex-Governor Frank Frantz of Oklahoma City, National Committeeman Cash Cade of Shawnee, former state Chairman Joe H. Norris of Guthrie, former Sheriff Charlie Carpenter of Guthrie and former Sheriff George Foster of Perry. Joe McNeal, recent candidate for Governor, has declared himself not a candidate.
 
Ada Evening News, December 19, 1910
Back For The Holidays
Special Officer Ed Brents arrived last night from northern Minnesota where he has been smashing saloons on Indian Reservations and will remain at home until after the holidays. It did not look much like holiday for him when we met him this morning, he had three big bundles of work under his arm that his superiors had fired down here for him to fix up while enjoying himself at home. He says he has been doing business lately, having put over 400 saloons out of business during the month of November.
 
Ada Evening News, December 19, 1910
Patrolmen Do A Good Night's Work
Saturday night Patrolmen Goyne and Brady rounded up a total of thirteen on different charges, principally drunks and gaming. Pretty fair night's work.
 
Ada Evening News, December 27, 1910
Chief Gets Six
Chief Hounshell and Special Officer Branch took a quiet walk last night and rounded up six persons of different colors and sexes who were not conducting themselves with absolute propriety, and the city is several dollars to the good today as a result of the contributions they made to the treasury.
 
Ada Evening News, December 29, 1910
Abernathy's Successor
Guthrie, Okla., Dec. 28 - Republican leaders here believe that Frank H. Greer, editor of the Guthrie State Capital, will be appointed United States Marshal of the Western district of Oklahoma, to succeed John Abernathy, resigned. It is stated that Cade is practically eliminated as a possibility for the place because of his alleged connection with Kickapoo Indian land transactions. Chris Madsen, chief deputy under Marshal Abernathy, was today appointed acting marshal of the district, to conduct the office until President Taft shall make the appointment.
 
*Ada Evening News, December 29, 1910
W.H. Reynolds, Indian Agent, Jack Carnes, policeman, and William Baker, supervisor, returned to Atoka this morning after the usual weekly visit to Ada.
 
*Ada Evening News, December 2, 1910
ABSTRACT
Deputy Sheriff of Pontotoc County, A.L. Miles, Sheriff T.J. Miles
 

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