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Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma
January - March 1909

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

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Ada Evening News, January 4, 1909
Wycliffes To Tour Country
Wagoner, Okla., Jan. 2 - Next spring and summer the north and east may have an opportunity of seeing the first real exhibition of Night Hawk Indians whose organization comprises a recalcitrant body of the Cherokee tribe. If plan materialize Thomas and John Wycliffe, famous Cherokee bandits, and their father will be the leaders of the arenal[sic] performances.
George W. Boatwright of Wagoner, is to be a partner of the Wycliffes in the wild west aggregation. The Wycliffes were here recently in consultation with Boatwright and they had the pictures made in both Indian and cowboy costumes.
The Wycliffe brothers are now under indictment charged with murdering Deputy United States Marshal Ike Gilstrap and another deputy marshal in the eastern part of the state over a year ago. Their trial is to take place in Sallisaw in March.
 
Ada Evening News, January 4, 1909
His Friend's Wife
Eufaula, Okla, Jan. 2 - Captured in the Jack Fork Mountains, 25 miles south of Hartshorne, by Deputy Sheriff W.R. Ransom, and Constable Will Sanders, S.D. Chapman was brought to Eufaula this morning and lodged in the county jail. He is charged with the rape of Mrs. John Samples about 15 miles northeast of Eufaula, Monday night, Dec. 28.
A large posse of officers and armed citizens have been scouring the surrounding country ever since the crime and had Chapman been captured in the neighborhood he would have been lynched.
Chapman is a married man and father of four children. He has been a respected citizen. He is about 40 years of age. On the night of the crime, Mr. and Mrs. Samples and Chapman went to a dance in Chapman's buggy. Reaching a hill on the return trip Chapman requested Samples to get out, saying the buggy was weak. When Samples reached the top of the hill he found his wife half dead having been choked almost into insensibility.
Chapman escaped and managed to leave the neighborhood before an enraged mob of citizens and officers vowing vengeance could affect his capture.
 
Ada Evening News, January 19, 1909
Oscar Collins, deputy sheriff at Roff, was in town today.
 
Ada Evening News, January 19, 1909
Ed Bunyard, city marshal of Roff, transacted business in Ada today.
 
Ada Evening News, January 19, 1909
A Unique Character
Deputy Sheriff Bob Nestor of national fame as an ex-deputy U.S. marshal on account of many unique and thrilling incidents connected with the field service, brought in A.W. Deckerson this morning, charged with disposing of mortgaged property.
 
Ada Evening News, January 19, 1909
Zeke Putnam's Funeral
This evening at 1:30, the funeral services of Zeke Putnam were held at the residence of W.E. Hall, brother-in-law of the deceased, conducted by Revs. Wilson and Barnhardt of the Methodist church.
The Odd Fellows then took charge of the remains and conducted the last sad rites at Rosedale cemetery in this city.
The assassination of Marshal Zeke Putnam, of Allen, as reported in the News yesterday, contained some errors, as it was impossible to get correct information by phone.
Marshal Putnam was in a store at the time he was killed, and was standing by a man who was sitting down by the counter eating a canned lunch.
As the bullets from the shotgun struck Marshal Putnam, he grabbed for his pistol, but the wounds were so instantaneously fatal, that he did not live long enough to pull his weapon, but fell over dead. Two shot entered his temple, one in the top of his head, one in his arm and two in his breast.
Sheriff Smith and Prosecuting Attorney Wimbish returned from Allen last night. They do not have anything to report for publication.
There was considerable suppressed excitement at Allen apparent as had been the case since the assassination.
Bloodhounds from Muskogee, McAlester, and Vinita, were carried to Allen, but they could not get any definite trail of the assassin.
Deputy Sheriff Bob Nestor tracked two horses from the scene of the crime going south, and there may he some developments later from the information gained by the clews[sic] gathered.
 
Ada Evening News, January 22, 1909
$300 Reward For Putnam's Slayer
Prosecuting Attorney Wimbish has received the following copy of the proclamation of Gov. Haskell, offering a reward of $300 for Marshal Zeke Putnam's slayer:
"Whereas on the night of the 16th day of January A.D. 1909, in the county of Pontotoc, State of Oklahoma, E.M. Putnam was murdered and whereas, the party or parties guilty of the commission of said offense are unknown, and have not been arrested or taken into custody: Now therefore, I, C.N. Haskell, Governor of the State of Oklahoma, by virtue of the authority vested in me by law, do hereby proclaim and offer, that the State of Oklahoma will pay as a reward the sum of three hundred ($300) dollars for the arrest and delivery to the Sheriff of said Pontotoc County any party guilty of said offense. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused to be affixed the Great Seal of the State of Oklahoma, at Guthrie, this 21st day of January A.D. 1909. [signed] C.N. Haskell, Governor of the State of Oklahoma."
 
*Ada Evening News, February 2, 1909
ABSTRACT
Set The Calaboose On Fire
mentions Chief of Police at Ada was Culver
 
Ada Evening News, March 1, 1909
Gus Bobbitt, A Prominent Citizen Is Assassinated
Former Bad Man Hunter And Alround[sic] Vigerous[sic] Western Character Meets Death While Performing the Labors of a Quiet Modest Farmer
This Rugged Character of the West, Feared and Hated by Many Bad Men, if Not by a Few Honest Men
As Gentle and Regardful as a Woman Among His Friends and Loved Ones
Mr. Bobbitt's Assassination
It is impossible for the News in this issue to afford the public an elaborate write up of the Gus Bobbitt assassination. The death, the manner of its hellish accomplishment, and the impression the extraordinary personality of the victim had wrought on the mind of the public during all the years of his life in this midst have so influenced the senses of our people that many words have been spoken and many scenes enacted which are portentous of much in the future, entirely enough if related and described to fill all the columns of the News and of such imparture and nature that if published the tenseness of the public's agitation would probably increase manifold.
The New's editor who achieves success for his paper must adhere to the policy and the principle of publishing the news and it is always agreed that the elaborateness of it preparation and the detail with which it is worked out should be commensurate with the interest of its reception by the public.
But the News ___[?] than of its functions as a newspaper is absolutely secondary to its consideration of the wishes of Mr. Bobbitt's closer friends and those who are leading in the undertaking to apprehend the assassin and accomplices; and agreeable to their wishes the reports of the clues found, the general evidence in hand and the names of parties suspicion remains censored from this issue of this paper.
It is promised that a little later the story of the Gus Bobbitt assassination the alleged events leading up to its consummation and the succeeding attendant transpirations will be published to the people of Pontotoc county.
Mr. A.A. Bobbitt, prominent citizen of Pontotoc county, was foully assassinated while on his way home Saturday evening, when he had reached a lonely spot about one-half mile from his home located seven miles southwest of Ada.
The following is related as the actual facts of the assassination:
Mr. Bobbitt left Ada for his home late Saturday afternoon, driving a wagon loaded with cotton seed meal...[possibly some missing here]...He quickly unhitched his team, secured Mr. Bobbitts team and drove swiftly to tell the news to the poor wife, who, standing on the gallery waiting for her devoted husband whose wagon rumble she noted in the distance, heard the gun reports executing the tragedy which was to break her heart. When Bob had related the deed to the horrified Mrs. woman, he hurried to Lawrence when he phoned in to doctors and officers. Mrs. Bobbitt flew to the scene. In a little while others came, but it was the devoted husband and wife that communed with each other. Lying there in the moon light with only the streaking shadows from the old tree which sheltered the murderer to transgress the hallowed scene, Gus, lying there pierced with 26 buck shot, dying, requested his wife to place his head in her lap. As he looked up into her grief stricken face, he related the story of his love for her, reviewing their life and commending her unselfish devotion to him throughout their walks together.
When the news reached Ada that Gus Bobbitt had been shot and a little later that he was dead, men's senses were not only shocked, but confused. Citizens began to congregate and within a few minutes, dozens...were off for the scene of [VERY MESSED UP IN COPY NEED TO LOOK AGAIN AND COPY]
 
Ada Evening News, March 2, 1909
Where is Jim Miller?
Reported Gone, But Nephew Arrested
And In Jail. Did Tom Smith
Los His One Chance To
Make Good?
It is already known by hundreds of people in this city and throughout the county that Jim Miller, reputed man killer, is suspected of being the assassin of Gus Bobbitt. The report is most current that Miller, whom it is related is under heavy bond for the alleged killing of Ben Collins two years ago was seen by several parties around the streets during last week when it was understood that he resided in New Mexico and that since Saturday he has disappeared from the community.
It is widely reported on the streets and the report is evidently punctured by a large element of truth, that Sheriff Tom Smith who was returning from Ardmore Monday morning where he had been in attendance on his father stricken with pneumonia saw this man Miller at the depot at Ardmore when he (Smith) was about to board the train, but he would not make an arrest, though holding Miller is suspicion, because he did not hold a warrant.
When the sheriff reached Ada, after consulting with the prosecuting attorneys and other officers, he made haste to return to Ardmore, presumably, for his man. He was accompanied by Oscar Collins, Bob Ferguson, and one other individual.
All day yesterday the Ada populace in more or less suspense and agitation awaited news concerning the success of the officers mission. No word was heard. Late yesterday afternoon, Buck Garrett, well known officer and old friend of Bobbitt's phoned Ike Klag stating that if warrant could be wired that he would get the man. The warrant was wired immediately, no further news cam.
All day the citizens have been waiting, some have used the wires, the local officers have been importuned to tell whether the arrest had been made, but no satisfaction resulted. The officers, though they paraded that deliciously attractive misterious[sic] air, and maintined that stony glare that would prone one to weep with admiration, either would not tell anything or know anything - and it is suspected the latter state represented their true condition. One of the boys became so restless that he phoned George McKnight at Ardmore, and told him to get out and for God's sake get the facts about Miller's arrest. It appears that George reported back that they had the man. Then it became the street supposition that officers were discreetly refraining from reporting the fact of the arrest and intended slipping prisoner in so as to avoid mob violence.
But after awhile, George McKnight phoned back, stating that after more deliberate inquiry, it appeared that arrest hadn't been made and that man had left Ardmore for parts unknown.
At 5 o'clock this P.M. the News received a message from a trusted private source in Ardmore that officers Tom Smith and Ardmore officers went out to the home of Jim Miller, said to reside five miles west of Ardmore, but found out that Miller had gone. The News' Ardmore friend relates that these officers arrested a young man, being the nephew of Miller, found at his home, for the reason so it is said, that such young fellow was seen in Ada with Miller just previous to the killing. This nephew of Miller was placed in jail at Ardmore. It is reported that Smith is still in Ardmore. Buck Garrett, the fearless chief of police of Ardmore, departed for the south this morning on the Santa Fe. Where did he go?
 
Ada Evening News, March 16, 1909
Notorious Wycliffs[sic]
Muskogee, Okla. March 15 - Tom and John Wycliffe[sic], full-blood Cherokees, charged with the murder of Deputy United States Marshal Gilstrap in a pitched battle in the Spavinaw Hills, March 11, 1906, were placed on trial at Tahlequah today. The jury had not been completed when court closed today.

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