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Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma
May-December 1908

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

 

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[No May abstracts]


Ada Evening News, June 9, 1908
Fought Over County Seat
The Citizens of Eufaula Armed Themselves To Meet The Invaders From Checotah
A Deputy Marshal May Die From Wounds
Eufaula, Ok., June 7 - In a fight between about fifteen Checotah persons and citizens of Eufaula this afternoon on the streets of Eufaula, F.M. Woods, deputy constable of this place, and Joseph Parmenter of Checotah, were shot. Woods probably will die. He was shot once through the body. Parmenter's wound is not dangerous. The trouble started when Constable Woods attempted to disarm Parmenter. About fifteen shots were fired in all. Immediately after the shooting J.C. Smock of Eufaula started a subscription list for paying for medical attention of both wounded men.
A Special Train Ready
With rifles and revolvers the Checotah men came to Eufaula to attempt to remove the county seat records by force. The county clerk is said to have furnished them the keys to the courthouse and the records were to be put in sacks and sent to Checotah on a special train which was to arrive later. Eufaula citizens were armed to prevent the removal because a temporary injunction had been granted by the supreme court. At the time of the trouble an officer was there to serve the papers on the county officials, but was waiting until Monday morning to make his action legal. A special train bearing more Checotah people was waiting ready to start for Eufaula, but after the trouble they did not come.
F.W. Ahrens, manager of Eufaula's county seat campaign, talked to Gov. Haskell over the long distance telephone, and the governor promised to wire Checotah to cease her efforts to remove the records until they have a legal right to them. In the county seat election held in McIntosh county on May 23, the race between Eufaula the present county seat and Checotah was so close that it required the official count to decide it. Governor Haskell announced his decision Saturday in favor of Checotah, but Eufaula immediately served notice of a contest and obtained an injunction before the supreme court to prevent the removal of the records until the contest is decided. In the meantime Checotah decided to attempt to remove the records to that town by force.
The affair is regretted by the conservative people of both towns. The county seat contest had been bitter up to today but there had been no violence. Tonight the streets of Eufaula are being patrolled by armed men.
 
Ada Evening News, June 10, 1908
Abandon Hunt; Negro At Large
Dogs To Be Placed On The Trail Of Murderer
Searching Diligently
Entertain Little Hope of Capturing Murderer
Oklahoma City, June 9 - The man hunt is about over. It has been unsuccessful.
With several of the posse returning to Kingfisher after having scoured the surrounding country, including hay stacks, thickets, lofts, huts, and every fence corner that suggested a hiding place, and with others expressing the belief that it is useless to chase further, it is given out by the officers who have led the search most vigorously and determinedly, that the Negro, Alf Hunter, who shot down Sheriff Garrison near Hitchcock, Friday afternoon last, has crossed the Cimarron River to the east and is now making his escape.
The officers have ordered blood hounds from Wichita, but have little hope of picking up the trail anywhere, since it is believed to be (even in the vicinity of Kingfisher) more than 48 hours old. Another thing being considered is that all of the surrounding conditions favor the fleeing murderer, the water in many places being up to the buggy bed, thus effectually covering up the trail
Surround Hunter - Story Doubted
Guthrie, Okla., June 8 - Alf Hunter or Jim Kinsbury, the Negro murderer of Sheriff Garrison of Oklahoma City is believed to be surrounded in the woods near Lowell, 22 miles north of here. He has traveled from Dover in Kingfisher County, adjoining, since last night, which he spent at the home of Mae[Mac?] King, seven miles northwest of Kingfisher. United States Marshal Abernathy and a posse left for Lovell[sic] late this afternoon to join in the hunt.
Fully 20 men are beating the brush in the vicinity of Lovell[sic] and Crescent City and the country is aroused.
A long distance telephone message to the Oklahoman from Sheriff Mahoney of Guthrie, indicates that the foregoing message is exaggerated. A Negro is under arrest at Lovell, but Mahoney does not believe that he is Hunter. At the request of Mahoney, United States Marshal Abernathy, Deputy Sheriff Muxlow and "Bill" Tillman[sic] have gone to Lovell to see the Negro.
George Jones, the Negro now in jail at Kingfisher, had an exciting time with the officers who placed a rope about his neck and threatened to string him up if he refused to tell the whereabouts of Kingsbury. Quivering and weeping, he was led to a nearby tree, the rope was passed over a limb and the old Negro was asked if he had anything further to say.
Pleading for mercy and declaring that he wished that he had never heard of Hunter, that he did not know anything about him or where he went, the officers desisted.
 
Ada Evening News, June 10, 1908
County Seat War
Two Dead - One Wounded At Eufaula
Muskogee, June 9 - Two dead men, another wounded and a fourth man in the federal jail for murder, two widowed women and five orphaned children, is the harrowing record up to date in the county seat war in McIntosh County.
At 11 o'clock last night City Marshal Wood of Eufaula died in the doctor's office at Eufaula, where he had been removed after having been shot by Special Deputy Sheriff Parmeter, of Checotah, who himself was shot twice through the hand during a battle on the streets of Eufaula late Sunday afternoon.
The dead marshal was 42 years of age and came to Eufaula about five years ago from West Virginia. He leave a widow and four children.
Still another chapter was added to the deadly feud between Checotah and Eufaula over the location of the county seat of McIntosh County and as a result General Dunlap lies dead at Eufaula and County Clerk Ed. C. Julian is in the federal jail in this city, awaiting his preliminary for the killing of Dunlap.
 
Ada Evening News, June 27, 1908
Col. Ed Brents Lands
The Ada Man Receives Message Announcing Nice Job
Ed Brents, for a long time office deputy marshal for the 16th recording district and later deputy at Muskogee, has received a message from W.E. Johnson, chief special officer for the Interior Department at Salt Lake City as follows: "Your appointment approved, enter on duty July 1st. Await letter." Ed seemed to be in a good humor on account of the "killing" but would not state what the emoluments would be, except that it was the best job he ever had. Mr. Brents' territory will be in the northwest, Montana, North and South Dakota, Utah, etc. The only regrettable feature is that he will be kept almost continually away from his family who will remain in Ada.
 
Ada Evening News, June 27, 1908
Liquor Den Found
Friday night about mid-night Walter Goyne and Bill Adare trailed a man and his liquor from the Katy yards to west Main street and while the gentleman was carefully putting the pint bottles away in the shooting gallery, the two deputies swooped down upon him whiskey and man and found that there was in his possession 47 pint bottles of sealed whiskey. E.E. Davis was arrested and released this morning under a $750 bond.


[No July or August Abstracts]


*Ada Evening News, September 4, 1908
Indian Police Are Rampant
They Attempt To Remove Ranchmen And Are Arrested By Sheriff. Serious Trouble Probable
Atoka, OK Sept 3 - Undaunted by the failure of today's operations, ten Choctaw Indian police, who went in a body to the Dulaney & Watson ranch four miles from Atoka, and after meeting with a refusal of their demands for the ranchmen to vacate, assaulted Peter Watson, clipped and tore down several rods of the pasture fence and were arrested by Sheriff Phillips, tonight announce their intention of driving the ranchmen from their lease tomorrow. Serious trouble is feared and the sheriff is preparing for an emergency. The action of the Indian Police was a result of the failure of the ranchmen to vacate their lands after been ordered to do so by the police. Dulaney & Watson occupy a lease of 20,000 acres on the segregated coal lands of the Choctaw Nation, and the police sought to eject them under an old treaty which they hold makes the ranchmen trespassers, Indian Agent Mills is not in sympathy with the police. Meeting in Atoka this morning, the police, all heavily armed rode in a body to the ranch. A formal demand for vacation was made and the ranchmen refused the demand. Watson attempted to argue with the Indians and was assaulted and seriously injured. Dulaney hurried to Atoka and notified the sheriff who went to the ranch and placed the Indians under arrest. In the mean time, however, the redskins had spent and hour in wire cutting and 5,000 cattle were given their liberty. The Indians were brought to Atoka and arranged[sic] before County Judge Linebaugh who admitted them to bond and fixed the preliminaries for September 17. Feeling is high among the police and their sympathizers and serious trouble may result tomorrow. The Dulaney & Watson Ranch is one of the oldest and largest in this section of the state. It embraces about 20,000 acres and is usually grazed by 3,000 to 5,000 cattle.
 
Ada Evening News, October 21, 1908
Constable Dillard of Ahloso is in Ada today.
 
Ada Evening News, October 21, 1908
New Office Deputy
A.L. Miles, of near Roff, has accepted a position with Sheriff Smith as office deputy, and will reside in Ada permanently. It will be remembered that Miles ran for Register of Deeds a year ago.
 
Ada Evening News, November 23, 1908
Lee Mortally Wounded
City Marshal Putnam of Allen Shoots Clarence Lee Who Was Resisting Arrest
E.M. Putnam, City Marshal of Allen, shot and mortally wounded Clarence Lee, mixed blood Indian, last Saturday, at this place.
It appears from the information obtainable, that Clarence Lee, who is also well-known here, was raising a disturbance at Allen last Saturday, when City Marshal Putnam went to arrest him. Lee resisted the officer and jerked Putnam's pistol out of his hand. They clinched and Putnam wrested the pistol from Lee and shot him in the left side, the ball going clear through and inflicting what is considered a mortal wound.
Marshal Putnam came to Ada Saturday night and surrendered to Sheriff Smith, and being taken before Justice H.J. Brown, was bound over in the sum of $1,000 and the bond given was worth $5,000.
Putnam is well-known in Ada, where he formerly resided for some time. He is highly esteemed and is popular.
Clarence Lee has some prominent relatives in this section and also has many friends, but is considered somewhat desperate when angry.
A late telephone message states that Lee is still alive, but his death is expected at any moment.
It is stated that the occurrence of opinion at Allen is to the effect that Putnam was justifiable, though the unfortunate affair is very much deplored. When in his normal condition, Clarence Lee was gentlemanly and pleasant.
 
Ada Evening News, December 3, 1908
Clarence Lee Dead
County Attorney Robert L. Wimbish and J.W. Bolen went to Allen last afternoon in behalf of the state against Zeke Putnam, city marshal of Allen, who some days ago shot and fatally wounded Clarence Lee, a mixed blood Indian citizen, and who died Wednesday. Judge Bolen will assist in the prosecution of Putnam.
Stone & Maxey have been retained by defendant. The killing it is related, occurred on account of Clarence's resisting arrest.
 
Ada Evening News, December 5, 1908
Additional Particulars Of Clarence Lee Killing
Since the death of Clarence Lee, who was shot by City Marshal Putnam at Allen, there has been gathered additional particulars that led up to the killing.
The following is the substance of statements gathered from witnesses claiming to have been present and seeing and hearing the particulars as herein related:
It seem that Clarence Lee and Mose Patterson were having a wrestling match, and that the former was victorious. Some one of the crowd of onlookers made some remarks about the wrestling, when Lee told him to keep his mouth out of it, and struck at the party who interfered.
At this juncture, City Marshal Putnam is said to have appeared and told Lee to come and go to the calaboose with him. Lee said he would pay a fine or give bond, but to wait until he put on his boots and he would go with him.
Putnam and Lee went alone toward the calaboose, a distance of nearly 400 yards. Two or three followed nearby. When Putnam and Lee reached the calaboose, they stopped and seemed to be pleasantly talking, when Putnam struck Lee with a small stick two or three times, and Lee hit at Putnam. The latter pushed Lee toward the calaboose, but he caught against the facing of the door.
Putnam finally pulled his pistol and Lee clinched with him and they fell. It is said that he grabbed Putnam's pistol and tried to keep it pointed away from him, but it was soon fired, the bullet passing through Lee's body, inflicting a fatal wound.
Putnam left the scene of the killing, but as he got away some distance, waived the crowd away that had started to where Lee lay, but as Putnam went on, the crowd soon went to the rescue of the wounded man.
In a statement made before he died, Clarence Lee gave substantially what is above stated, as the facts, adding that he was friendly with Putnam, and was willing to give bond or pay a fine, and that he was not drunk, nor was he armed. Also that what he did in resisting Putnam was in self-defense, and that Putnam would hear to nothing, except to put him in the calaboose.
 
Ada Evening News, December 5, 1908
Ardmore, Dec. 4 - The news of a serious shooting affair which took place at Mulkey, east of here in this county, reached here at an early hour this morning. Dennis Lawson, of Mill Creek, and who formerly lived here, is shot and cannot live and John Mulkey is in the county jail and acknowledges to the shooting. From the best reports that can be gathered, Lawson and Mulkey were in Ardmore yesterday. Lawson wanted to buy some cattle belonging to Jim Mulkey and went home with John. Last night, Mrs. Mulkey was at the home of her mother in Berwyn, and Lawson, Mulkey, Ben Lambert and Waters Brown were at the home of John Mulkey. All the men or at least some of them were drinking and shooting craps. Some trouble arose and Lawson was shot with a shotgun by Mulkey. The load took effect in the stomach.
It is said that there is no hope for Lawson and it is expected that he will die before sunset tonight. Squire Thompson, the justice of the peace at Mulkey, took the statement of Lawson. The dying man said that a crap game was going on , that some trouble arose and he left the house to keep out of it. As he passed around the house Mulkey met him and while four feet away emptied the contents of a shot gun into his stomach. He stated that Mulkey did the shooting without uttering a word.
Mulkey in his statement says the game was going on, that trouble arose, that Lawson abused him terribly, that Lawson left the room and as he thought had gone away; Mulkey opened the door and found that Lawson had not gone, but again approached him (Mulkey) with his knife, still abusing him, and then it was that Mulkey fired.
Dennis Lawson, a prominent young cattleman of Mill Creek, died this afternoon at Mulkey, a few miles east of here, from a gun shot wound received in the stomach this morning at 1 o'clock. John Mulkey, an intermarried Chickasaw citizen, surrendered and is in jail. The weapon used was a shot gun and muzzle was in four feet of Lawson's body when gun was discharged.
 
Ada Evening News, December 9, 1908
Marshal Putnam's Trial
The preliminary trial of Marshal Putnam of Allen, for the killing of Clarence Lee, has been before Esq. Brown in Ada today.
Prosecuting Attorney Wimbish, assisted by J.W. Bolen, of Crawford & Bolen, represents the prosecution, while Duke Stone of Stone & Maxey is conducting the defense.
Several witnesses were examined, but all the News reporter heard was the evidence of an eye witness, who was near Putnam and Lee at the time of the killing and he was called there by Putnam.
The following is the substance of his testimony:
After Putnam had arrived at the calaboose with Lee, the latter stepped up in the door and said, that he would go in this time, but that he would get Putnam.
The latter said, "alright go on in".
Lee turned and said that, he would whip Putnam then and stepped down from the door to the ground and started toward Putnam, who backed some and struck at Lee with a small stick.
As Lee advanced, Putnam dropped the small stick and pulled his pistol. As he did so, Lee caught Putnam around the arms and body and got hold of the hand of Putnam that held the pistol.
After swinging their arms around four or five times, they fell with Lee on top.
Soon after falling, the pistol fired.
Putnam remarked that he "hated to do this".
Lee said, "that's alright, you have shot me."
The News has previously published different versions of this unfortunate affair, as it could be gathered from hearsay, and has done so without bias in the matter, consequently, it gives the substance of the evidence of an eye witness, which is possibly about as near the facts in the case as will be arrived at.
As the News goes to press this evening the trial has not ended.
 
Ada Evening News, December 9, 1908
Constable Robinson of Allen is in Ada today, as a witness in the trial of Marshal Putnam of that place.
 
Ada Evening News, December 10, 1908
There were thirty-two Allen people in Ada yesterday attending the examining trial of Marshall[sic] Putnam.
 
Ada Evening News, December 10, 1908
Marshal Putnam Bound Over
At the conclusion of the examining trial of Marshal Putnam of Allen held before Esq. Brown of Ada yesterday, he was bound over to the grand jury in the sum of $2,000. Marshall[sic] Putnam readily made the bond.
 
Ada Evening News, December 14, 1908
John W. Green, deputy sheriff of York, is in the city today.
 
*Ada Evening News, December 28, 1908
ABSTRACT
Alf McKay, Indian Police
 
*Ada Evening News, December 28, 1908
Policeman Shoots Negro
Tulsa, OK Dec 26 - Policeman Tom Flannigan engaged in a battle with E.S. Stevenson, a Negro, today. Stevenson was armed with a butcher knife and the policeman with a pistol. Flannigan fired three shots, one striking the Negro, the others going wild. E.S. Flannigan, a night watchman, was struck by a stray bullet.
 
*Ada Evening News, December 28, 1908
Well-Known Character Killed
Oklahoma City, OK Dec 25 - "Billy" Bunch, a well-known character at Coalgate, was killed there at noon today while resisting arrest by City Marshal Stouz, his brother-in-law. Bunch opened fire upon Stouz and Constable Kennedy, his brother-in-law, and two other men when they sought to arrest him.
 
*Ada Evening News, December 28, 1908
ABSTRACT
Horrible Crime Confessed
mentions Sheriff Nicewander at Perry, OK

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