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Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma
January-April 1908

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

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Ada Evening News, January 7, 1908
ABSTRACT
mentions Undersheriff of Pontotoc County is Sam McClure.
 
Ada Evening News, January 9, 1908
To Deny Requisitions
Guthrie, Okla., Jan. 8 - Gov. Haskell will deny the requisition of the Acting Governor of Arkansas for the return of Henry Starr, a Cherokee Indian, to that state for alleged participation in a robbery committed in Benton County fifteen years ago. The refusal is based upon an opinion of the Attorney General's department and decisions of the United States Court covering similar cases.
 
Ada Evening News, January 22, 1908
Deputy U.S. Marshal Ed Brents of Muskogee is in the city today.
 
Ada Evening News, January 22, 1908
Constable Jim Lilliard of Francis is here today.
 
Ada Evening News, January 27, 1908
Dick Townsend Arrested
Constable J.M. Raney arrested one Dick Townsend on Jack Fork Creek Sunday on the charge of larceny. He was lodged in the county jail.
 
Ada Evening News, February 19, 1908
Porter Nomination Held Up
Additional Charges Have Recently Been Filed Against Him
Washington, Feb. 18 - One of the many presidential nominations held up in the Senate is that of G.A. Porter to be United States Marshal at Muskogee. The prospect of Porter's re-nomination seem more remote now than it did some weeks ago, for lately additional charges have been filed against him and until these are disproven it is not likely that any action will be taken.
 
Ada Evening News, February 19, 1908
Ed Brents Did It
Arrests Alleged Moonshiner On Streets Of Muskogee
Muskogee, Okla, Feb. 18 - After evading the officers for six years, John M. Bennett, charged with operating a moonshine still near Alabam, in Madison County, Arkansas, was arrested in the street here by Deputy United States Marshal Ed Brents as a fugitive from justice. Bennett waived requisition and was taken to Fort Smith. Bennett was indicted in the Western District of Arkansas six years ago and when the revenue officers got on his trail, left Arkansas and came to the Indian Territory. For years he lived in the hills between Fort Gibson and Tahlequah, where it is said he laid plans for the operation of a still, but feared the United States Officers. After Oklahoma became a state Bennett became bolder and two months ago he and his wife came to Muskogee. There was little sentiment in his leave taking when he bid his wife goodbye. He asked the officer to accompany him to his home in the south part of the city. "Mary", he said in a matter of fact way, "I'm leaving you and don't know when I'll get back. Do the best you kin. Goodbye."
 
Ada Evening News, March 4, 1908
S.G. Victor Is Appointed Marshall
Washington, D.C., March 3 - S.G. Victor of Afton was today appointed United States Marshall[sic] of the eastern district of Oklahoma. His name was presented by President Roosevelt after the senate committee refused to confirm Porter. Grant Victor, of Afton known to every republican in the state of Oklahoma, the genial good natured politician, and the former chairman of the Indian Territory republican central committee before the consolidation of the two political organizations under the chairmanship of Jake Hamon of Lawton, Okla., has been appointed United States Marshall[sic] of the Eastern district of Oklahoma in the place of G.A. Porter whose nomination was withdrawn by the president at the request of the judiciary committee of the United States. Grant Victor is every inch a farmer and on top of that he is a politician. In the summer he can be found making hay upon his broad acres near Afton, Okla., and in the winter he can be found "making hay" while many other politicians are asleep. Mr. Victor was at Sapulpa, Okla., last night, as one of the delegates to the Third District congressional convention, when the news came of his appointment, and he was soon very busy, receiving the congratulations of his friends.
 
Ada Evening News, March 4, 1908
Reveals Plot To Shoot Two
Tells Story Of Conspiracy To Slay Special Officer Johnson
Muskogee, Okla., March 3 - Jack Pattman, alias Jack Baldridge, under arrest charged jointly with Ben and Eugene Tittsworth[sic] with killing Sam Roberts, a deputy marshal, in the trial of Eugene Tittsworth[sic], swore that which they were in jail at Fort Smith that Tittsworth[sic] agreed to give him $2,000 to kill W.E. Johnson, the representative of the department of interior who was fighting the bootleggers, and Dr. Sapper, a deputy working under Johnson. Sapper was wounded when Roberts was killed. Pattman says Tittsworth[sic] called to him to shoot and he shot Roberts and killed him. Sapper was shot in the same fight, but Pattman says he did not shoot Sapper. Sapper and Johnson had broke up a near beer joint owned by the Tittsworths[sic].
 
Ada Evening News, March 7, 1908
Killing May Result
Harry Levy Waits For Editor And Talks About Shooting - Criminal Libel Warrant
Muskogee, Okla., March 6 - Warrant for the arrest of Eugene M. Kerr, managing editor and part owner of the Times-Democrat, the democratic organ of Muskogee and the eastern half of Oklahoma, on a charge of criminal libel was sworn out here tonight before county judge Jackson, and will be served in the morning. Harry Levy, city councilman, swears out the warrant and bases it on an article in the Times-Democrat of Tuesday of this week, charging Levy with having attempted to bribe County Attorney Crump to allow the houses of prostitution to run unmolested in Muskogee.
For a short time this afternoon it was feared that blood would be shed as Levy was seeking for Kerr with a revolver swearing he would kill him on sight. The councilman took up a position a short distance from Kerr's office and remained there the entire afternoon waiting for the editor, telling every man passing that he was waiting for Kerr to kill him. Kerr, who is an ex-deputy United States marshal and a dead shot with a revolver, wished to avoid trouble with Levy, but intimated through a friend of the beligerent[sic] councilman that if Levy kept up his game for a short time longer he would put him out of business. Levy, whose anger had cooled somewhat tonight then decided that the better part of valor would be to prosecute for libel than to mix with the editor and left his place of vantage in front of the Times-Democrat office.
 
Ada Evening News, March 8, 1908
Reveals Plot To Shoot Two
Tells Story of Conspiracy to Slay Special Officer Johnson
Muskgoee, Okla. March 3 - Jack Pattman, alias Jack Baldridge, under arrest charged jointly with Ben and Eugene Tittsworth with killing Sam Roberts, a deputy marshal, in the trial of Eugene Tittsworth, swore that while they were in jail at Fort Smith that Tittsworth agreed to give him $2,000 to kill W.E. Johnson, the representative of the department of the interior who was fighting the bootleggers, and Dr. Sapper, a deputy working under Johnson. Sapper was wounded when Roberts was killed. Pattman says Tittsworth called to him to shoot and he shot Roberts and killed him. Sapper was shot in the same fight, but Pattman says he did not shoot Sapper. Sapper and Johnson had broken up a near beer joint owned by the Tittsworths.
 
Ada Evening News, March 8, 1908
S.G. Victor Is Appointed Marshall[sic]
Washington D.C. March 3 - S.G. Victor of Afton was today appointed United States marshall[sic] of the eastern district of Oklahoma. His name was presented by President Roosevelt after the Senate committee refused to confirm Porter. Grant Victor, of Afton, known to every Republican in the state of Oklahoma, the genial good natured politician, and the former chairman of the Indian Territory republican central committee before the consolidation of the two political organizations under the chairmanship of Jake Hamon of Lawton, Oklahoma, has been appointed United States Marshall[sic] in the Eastern district of Oklahoma in the place of G.A. Porter whose nomination was withdrawn by the president at the request of the Judiciary Committee of the United States. Grant Victor is every inch a farmer and on top of that he is a politician. In the summer he can be found making hay upon his broad acres near Afton, Okla. and in the winter he can be found "making hay" while many other politicians are asleep. Mr. Victor was at Sapulpa, Okla. last night, as one of the delegates to the Third District congressional convention, when the news came of his appointment, and he was soon very busy receiving the congratulations of his friends.
 
Ada Evening News, March 16, 1908
Bandits Disarm Oklahoma Posse
Kansas Bank Robbers Get The "Drop" On Deputy U.S. Marshal
Render Weapons Useless
After Warning Officers, Desperadoes Make Escape, Riding Toward Osage Hills
Oklahoma City, Ok., March 15 - A Deputy United States Marshal and five possemen of Ocelata today at noon encountered the three bandits who robbed the bank at Tyro, Kan. The robbers got the drop on them and commanded them to throw up their hands. The officers complied. The robbers then took all the guns and pistols away from the officers and broke them to pieces. The officers were then warned to turn back and quit the trail. The robbers took to the woods and went in the direction of the Osage Hills. The posse struck the trail of the bandits early this morning and after following it for several hours lost it near a farm house. Stopping at the farm house, the officers inquired if three men had been seen. The occupants of the house denied any knowledge of the outlaws. Learning they were pursued, the robbers took a round-about way and surprised the officers in a clump of trees.
 
Ada Evening News, March 27, 1908
Choice of Ledbetter Endorsed
Guthrie, Okla, March 26 - Members of the Oklahoma Anti-Saloon League are elated over the election of "Bud" Ledbetter as chief of police at Muskogee. Ledbetter was on the Democratic ticket and one of the two who got through. Prior to statehood he was deputy United States marshal in the Muskogee district and gained quite a reputation as a "booze buster". The League members are of the opinion the prohibition law will be rigidly enforced there.

Ada Evening News, April 18, 1908
T.E. Brents is home from Wagoner spending a few days with his family. Ed is now under-sheriff of Wagoner County, but has something up his sleeve that will be much more remunerative in a short time. He will keep his family in Ada.

 
Ada Evening News, April 20, 1908
Appointed Special Officer
Ed Brents, who has been a resident of Ada for a long time, and well known and liked by all, has been appointed deputy special officer for all Indian reservations under W.S.[sic] Johnson, known in this country as pussy foot. This is a lucrative as well as a responsible position and Ed's many friends will be glad to hear of his appointment.
 
Ada Evening News, April 23, 1908
Pretty Girl Carries Big Six-Shooter
Is Empowered To Make Arrests, Serve Papers, and She Knows How To Shoot
Muskogee, Okla., April 22 - Beulah Reynolds, deputy United States marshal in the eastern district of Oklahoma. That is the way it reads on the pay-roll, and the petite, handsome girl that answers to the name is a real deputy marshal under Grant Victor, with authority to carry a six-shooter, a privilege which she uses.
Miss Reynolds was employed as a stenographer, but she insisted on taking the same oath that any other deputy marshal takes, and is subject to the same rules and duties. So far as known she is the only woman actually in service as a deputy United States marshal. She has authority to make arrests, raids, serve papers and even go into the field on special duty.
When she took the oath she was asked if she would make an arrest or take part in a real fight if it came to a show down. "I am not a quiter," she said. The next morning when the marshal came down he found lying on the desk of his new deputy a pearl handled six-shooter of excellent make handsomely engraved and every chamber loaded. The young woman has been carrying the gun when she thought she needed it and she knows how to use it.
 
Ada Evening News, April 24, 1908
Effort To Wreck Frisco Train
Tulsa, Ok, April 23 - A heavy obstruction, consisting of a ten-inch bridge spike wedged in between two rails and a fish plate securely strapped to the rail, the whole so arranged so that any train on striking the obstruction would have been sent into the ditch, was discovered by Deputy United States Marshal C.W. Hanna on the Frisco at a point two miles east of the city. Officer Hanna made haste to remove the obstruction and had but done it when a fast westbound passenger train dashed by. In all probability a serious wreck was averted. An effort is being made to apprehend the would-be train wreckers, whose motive may have been robbery.
 
Ada Evening News, April 29, 1908
Over 200,000 Bottles Liquor Confiscated
Guthrie, Ok., April 28 - W.E. Johnson, of Maryland, who has been operating in Indian Territory for more than a year under the direction of the interior department, in the suppression of the liquor traffic among the Indians, has been made chief special officer for all the Indian reservations of the United States and will have headquarters in Salt Lake City. Mr. Johnson came here recently from Santa Fe, N.M. to attend the Oklahoma prohibition convention and served as chairman of the committee on resolutions.
During his stay in Indian Territory he has a record of confiscating more than 200,000 bottles of various concoctions said to have contained liquor, and prohibited under the federal laws applying to Indian Territory was constituted the prohibited district. In addition to the bottled goods more than 40,000 gallons of bulk goods was poured in the gutters, making a total of about 70,000 gallons of "cheer" destroyed in fourteen months.
How He Broke Booze
Operating in Indian Territory, Johnson's authority was supreme when it came to the destruction of liquor, and the same authority obtains in his new position. It was his custom to enter the freight buildings of railroads after determining certain freight contained contraband goods, open the boxes and with a small hammer put a hole in the bottom of the bottles. In one instance several thousand bottles of "two per cent" were poured into the Arkansas river near Tulsa. Many of the brands of "patent medicines" were similarly treated wherever found.
For months before leaving Indian Territory Johnson was said to have been a marked man, and several attempts were made to take his life. While always armed, he never used a firearm where a substitute would answer. Four of his deputies were killed in three instances being mistaken for Johnson, and three others were seriously wounded.
In physique Johnson is something of an athlete, and while mild in manner and always good of nature, he was apparently fearless in the discharge of his duty, and went places when warned to remain away. His closest call was probably in a Cherokee nation town, where he heard a quantity of beer was being kept in the rear of a pool hall. Unknown to the inmates, Johnson entered, found the goods, completed the work of destruction, and upon coming out was met by a band of loungers who had selected one to make the attack. He did so with a knife, but a handy billiard cue was wielded by the governmental agent, and it required the services of a physician for four hours to restore the belligerent to his reason.
How The Name Stuck
Johnson was known throughout Indian Territory as "Pussyfoot" a soubriquet that has already followed him to the far west. In making his appearance in the Muskogee district the governmental agent sought no advertisement, but began work on "two per cent" and bitters. The Muskogee papers referred to him as "the gent with the panther tread" and one "who steals o'er the landscape like a summer sephyr" From this it went to Pussyfoot and the name stuck.
"I can't get away from it," said Johnson when he recently[sic], "for I am now beginning to get mail addressed that way. I thought when I left Indian Territory that reputation would be left behind. Only a week ago I entered a hotel in Los Angeles, and some one called out "Pussyfoot, what the h--l[sic] are you doing out here?" The speaker was a former resident of Muskogee."
In discussing his reason for his numerous nicknames, Johnson admits that he wears rubber heels on his shoes, but no "creepers".

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