[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Indian Territory (OK)
May-July 1907

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

 

Honor on the Web

None of these newspaper abstracts are free for the taking. Read Terms of Use.

Dividing Line

Ada Evening News, May 1, 1907
Deputy U.S. Marshal Cummings returned last night from court at Ardmore. He reported that Joe Wall, who was charged with introducing, had been acquitted.
 
Ada Evening News, May 1, 1907
Deputy City Marshal Baxter Fretwell left last night for a few days' visit at Abbott, Ark.
 
Ada Evening News, May 16, 1907
To Retain Positions
Abernathy and Porter Will Continue As Marshals
President Pleased With Records Of Noted Wolf Catcher And Of Cowboy
How Former Secured His Job
Guthrie, Ok. - The good records as wolf catcher and cowboy that first secured for John R. Abernathy and Grosvenor A. Porter their positions as United States marshals have proved sufficient to retain for them these positions after statehood. Both men came into these positions untried, but each have had clean records, and while recently in Washington they were both assured by President Roosevelt that they would be reappointed. Abernathy for the western or Oklahoma district for the new states, and Porter for the eastern or Indian territory district.
It was while on a lobo wolf hunting trip in the "big pasture" in southwestern Oklahoma that President Roosevelt first met John Abernathy. The hunting trip had been engineered by Colonel Cecil Lyon of Texas and at the suggestion of President Roosevelt that some good man be procured to look after the details of the trip. Colonel Lyon recommended "a hunter by the name of Abernathy living down in Oklahoma, who with his hands could catch the lobo alive."
This description pleased the president and instructions were given to secure Abernathy's services for the occasion. This was done and Mr. Abernathy arranged the details for the hunt in the "pasture". To the president's delight Mr. Abernathy performed the feat of catching a lobo wolf alive with his bare hands.
The week's hunt in the "pasture" were very successful, the president was highly pleased and as a result Mr. Abernathy was later appointed United States marshal for Oklahoma, a position that pays an annual salary of $5,000.
Following the appointment of Abernathy as marshal the facts of his exploits as a hunter and trapper were published widely, not only in the United States, but even in England, France, and Germany.
"Grove" Porter, a youth attending the St. Paul military school at Garden City, L.I., caught the cowboy fever as a result of the tales of adventure that drifted back to civilization in connection with the cowboy experiences of Theodore Roosevelt, at that time in the West.
The disease proved incurable as far as Porter was concerned and he went to Cheyenne, Wyo., a tenderfoot and at a time, too, when it took nerve for a tenderfoot to remain in that locality.
Porter was born about 36 years ago in Frederick county, Maryland, and when ten years old was placed by his parents in the St. Paul military school, from which he ran away to become a cowboy.
"Grove" Porter, although but a youngster, had the nerve, however, and he stayed in Wyoming. He secured employment immediately and rode the range for six years.
The climax was reached when Porter was appointed deputy marshal and served during the hottest period ever known in that state. This, too, was the first work as a peace officer for Porter although not long afterward he was commissioned a deputy sheriff in Laramie county, and he had four years more of strenuous life as an officer.
 
Ada Evening News, June 3, 1907
Seven Years Sentence
J.T. Wright Passed A Bogus $20.00 Bill On An Alva Merchant
Guthrie, Okla, June 2 - J.T. Wright, under sentence to the federal penitentiary for seven years, was brought to the federal jail here today by Deputy Marshal Jacobson from Alva where he was convicted on a charge of raising one dollar silver certificates to twenty dollar bills. One jury convicted Wright, while another acquitted his partner. Ode Smeadley. Wright passed one of the bogus bills on Harry Tanner, an Alva merchant, in payment for a fifteen cent sox, and received $19.85 in charge by Tanner. The marshal's office has collected several of these changed bills, and to all but an expert eye they would pass muster.
 
Ada Evening News, June 3, 1907
Deputy Marshal Brents Saturday night received word that there were three booze peddlers at Tyrola with all the goods they could carry in three wagons. They asked that Ed send a man there. Over the phone Ed authorized several Tyrola men to go and capture the men. They agreed to hold the fellows until a marshal could arrive Sunday morning. Brents had word Sunday that the fellows had opened fire on the pursuers and had completely put them to route. Thus Ed lost some big game.
 
Ada Evening News, June 7, 1907
Another Term Of Court
U.S. District Court Will Convene In Ada Sept. 30
Some months ago when it was ordered that all U.S. Court process to be made returnable to Ardmore it was thought probable that Ada would not have another term of federal court; that not another federal grand jury would be impaneled here. But Office Deputy U.S. Marshal Brents has recent official advice to the effect that the court will convene in Ada again September 30, and possibly again next spring. The September term may last five or six weeks for the purpose of cleaning up the docket preparatory to statehood. Local deputy marshals are now serving process in civil matters returnable at Ada, September 30. U.S. Commissioner Winn still holds over felony prisoners to await action of the grand jury at Ardmore July 1. But Mr. Brents states that all criminal cases in this vicinity will, on motion, be transferred back from Ardmore to Ada.
 
Ada Evening News, June 7, 1907
Will Test The Liquor Law
Liveryman Wants Back Rig In Which Booze Was Found
Tulsa, I.T. June 7 - Arthur Antle, a liveryman of this city, will question in court the right of the federal government to confiscate a rig in which liquor was found, rented out by an innocent livery dealer. The federal authorities Wednesday night, led by William E. Johnson, came upon a rig near Red Fork in which six cases of beer were being hauled from Keyston, Okla. to Tulsa. The driver had fled. The rig proved to be the property of Antle, who rented it out yesterday morning to an unknown party. Antle will endeavor to recover the property which Uncle Sam now claims as "contraband of war". The law on this subject plainly says any conveyance in which liquor is found is contraband and must be confiscated and sold within a reasonable time, the money to go into the federal coffers. Antle does not think that he, an innocent party, should be made to lose his rig, which is very valuable, yet such may be the outcome.
 
Ada Evening News, June 12, 1907
For Disposing Of Booze
U.S. Deputy Marshall[sic] Brents brought in today from the Springbrook country a man named Norton charged with an unlawful handling of booze, while none of the beverage was found on the accused, the officers say they have plenty of incriminating evidence.
 
Ada Evening News, June 18, 1907
George Tuncall, Deputy U.S. Marshal at Coalgate, was in the city today.
 
Ada Evening News, June 18, 1907
Bit Other Fellow's Ear Off
Bos Chadwick On Trial For Maiming - Did He Swallow It?
Boss Chadwick, of near Roff, is going through preliminary trial this afternoon for the unusual crime of maiming. The prosecuting witness, Charles Matthews, of the same neighborhood, has the top half of an ear missing, and accuses Boss of biting it off yesterday. Furthermore, he and his wife aver[sic] that Boss swallowed the ear, for they looked all around in the weeds for it so they might stick it back on. But, Boss stoutly denies the cannibalistic stunt; he is positive he spit it out. Deputy Brent[sic] brought the prisoner in last night, and had some little trouble keeping him and the prosecuting witness apart.
 
Ada Evening News, June 19, 1907
Ponies Were Found Guilty
They Hauled Booze And Got Confiscated By Government
Muskogee, I.T., June 18 - A new departure was taken from the accustomed method of the United States officers in Indian Territory for the suppression of bootlegging whisky, when William E. Johnson, special officer of the government, for this purpose, arrested two ponies which were hitched to a light wagon near Sapulpa a few days ago in which there was a large supply of whiskey. The charge against the ponies was aiding and abetting in the introduction of spirituous liquors and vinous malts into the Territory contrary to the laws of the United States. The ponies were sold by order of the court to the highest bidder for cash by the United States Marshal of the western district and bought by G.D. Sleeper of Wagoner, I.T.
According to the law against introducing, all horses, conveyances, etc. may be confiscated and sold by order of the court, hence the proceeding.
 
Ada Evening News, June 21, 1907
Killing At Mill Creek
Former City Marshal Shot Bud English In Waco Jim's Joint
Deceased Once Under Indictment In Ada Court For Murder
Intelligence reached the U.S. Marshal's office at Ada Thursday night of a killing at Mill Creek late in the afternoon. It was reported that M.L. Moore shot and killed Bud English in Waco Jim's pool hall. The tragedy is said to have grown out of an old grudge. It seems that Moore while city marshal of Mill Creek arrested English several times on whiskey charges, and that the utmost ill feelings existed between the two. Moore, formerly city marshal in Mill Creek, was a candidate for sheriff in the recent primary in Johnson County. English was a notorious character in this country. Several years ago he was under indictment in the U.S. Court at Ada for killing Bill Cain, a deputy U.S. marshal, 13 or 14 years ago. The case, among the first docketed in the Ada court, was dismissed for want of jurisdiction. Moore was taken to Tishomingo where his case will be triable[sic].
 
Ada Evening News, June 24, 1907
Fierce War On Liquor
Office Deputy U.S. Marshal Brents states he has filed 13 complaints during the last two days against parties selling booze.
 
Ada Evening News, June 26, 1907
One Combatant Is Dead And The Other Is Dying
Purcell, I.T., June 25 - In an altercation which occurred at Dibble, a small village twenty miles west of here, last night at 11 o'clock, Dr. J.H. Howard, a prominent physician and citizen of that community, was shot and instantly killed, and James Reasor, a farmer, lies mortally wounded at the home of Chris Williams, near Dibble. Reasor notified the marshal's office here last night that he was ready to give himself up, and Deputy Burton left immediately for the scene of the tragedy, but this afternoon he phoned the office here that Reasor was mortally wounded and could not be moved. Dr. Howard will be buried at Dibble tomorrow.
 
Ada Evening News, July 2, 1907
Roff Woman Recovering
Deputy Marshal Brents came in this morning from Ardmore, where he attended the convening of the big court. At Roff he learned that Mrs. Joe L. Thomas, who on Sunday killed her daughter and tried to suicide, is improving, with strong prospects of recovery from the self-inflicted wounds. She talks considerably, it is said, but not at all rationally. Mr. Brents states that none of the Pontotoc county cases will be tried in the Ardmore court, but that all such cases will be transferred back to the Ada court for the September term.
 
Ada Evening News, July 6, 1907
Officer Shot And Killed
Another Wounded As Result Of Shooting At Picnic At Porum, I.T.
Muskogee, I.T., July 5 - Deputy Marshal Sam Roberts is dead and Deputy United States Marshal J.E. Sapper has a scalp wound, having been shot in the head, as the result of a shooting affray at a picnic at Porum, I.T. today. Eugene Titsworth and Jack Baldridge were selling soft drinks, when Sapper and Roberts attempted to search the booth. Some one shouted out, Look out, Sapper! when the officer drew his gun as if to fire. The officers were fired on, killing Roberts and wounding Sapper. Titsworth and Baldridge came in to Muskogee and gave themselves up tonight. The dead man was a special deputy of William E. Johnson of the interior department.
 
Ada Evening News, July 6, 1907
Killed By Officer
Man Well Known In Territory Shot While Resisting Arrest
Sulphur, I.T. July 5 - Deputy U.S. Marshal R.S. Bailey shot and killed Tom Carroll, who was well known over Indian Territory this evening at 6:30 o'clock in Carroll's saloon, while he was resisting arrest. It is stated that Carroll fired two shots at Bailey before Bailey could secure his gun, but without effect, and Bailey shot him before he could fire a third time.
 
Ada Evening News, July 12, 1907
Baldridge Captured
Murderer Surprised On Lonely Road By Deputy Marshal
Muskogee, I.T., July 12 - Bud Ledbetter of the Muskogee marshal's office was sent to make the arrest of Jack Baldridge, charged with the murder of Deputy Marshal Sam Roberts and the wounding of Deputy Marshal E.J. Sapper at Porum, I.T. a week ago. After the heavily armed posse returned unsuccessful. Wednesday, Ledbetter returned to the city yesterday with his prisoner, having taken him unaware on a lonely road in the Canadian bottom near Whitefield, accompanied by his brother. The appearance of the marshal was a complete surprise to the men. Baldridge had been scouting ever since the killing, and had sent message of defiance to the marshal's office. Baldridge, heavily ironed, was placed on the Midland Valley train at Stigler. News of the capture of Baldridge spread like wildfire, and as the train stopped at the stations on the way to Muskogee the platforms were crowded with the curious. Baldridge is now in a heavy iron cell in the federal jail here.
 
Ada Evening News, July 13, 1907
Hired To Murder Officer
Such Is The Testimony Of Baldridge, The Killer, In Preliminary Hearing
Muskogee, I.T., July 13 - A sensation was sprung in the examining trial at Checotah yesterday of Jack Baldridge, alias many other names, charged with the murder of Deputy Sam Roberts and the wounding of Deputy Sapper, for which Ben and Eugene Titsworth of Porum, are also held, when Baldridge turned states evidence on the Titsworths, and said on the stand that the Titsworths had agreed to give him $3,000 to kill the two deputy marshals, and that they had advanced him $25 after the shooting.
Baldridge said the Titsworths had hauled him to the Titsworth home, where they had him take off the new suit of clothes which they had given him the day before for fear he would be recognized. They put him in a wagon and hauled him to the edge of the woods, where they left him, and where the father of Baldridge had agreed to come for him in a wagon in which they both were to leave the country.
The fact that the deputy marshals at Porum suspected Baldridge, Sr., and watched him so that he was unable to go to the rendezvous resulted in the capture of Baldridge by Marshal Bud Ledbetter.
J.W. Atkinson, who was arrested with Baldridge and who claims to be his brother, pleaded guilty to being an accessory to the crime in that he had delivered $20 to Baldridge from the Titsworths while Baldridge was hiding in the woods.
 
Ada Evening News, July 13, 1907
Crime On The Decrease?
Hardly, Judging From Record of U.S. Marshal's Office This Month
"Not much doing around this jigger, is there?" inquired The News man as he sauntered into the U.S. marshal's office at Ada.
"Think not?" replied Deputy Brents. "Then just cast your orbs over this," and he showed The News man a calendar of fresh crime which indicates that "piping times of peace" are not yet. The following is a list showing arrests by Mr. Brents himself during the last twelve days, and what was done with the accused:
Lee Cahoon, malicious mischief; in Ardmore jail.
Albert Cahoon, grand larceny; in Ardmore jail.
Richard Maxwell, grand larceny; in Ardmore jail.
Wesley Bowlin, disturbing the peace; paid fine.
L.D. Finley, assault to kill; in Ardmore jail
Joe Carroll, assault to kill; in Ardmore jail.
R.S. Bailey, murder; discharged
Tommy Gordon, disturbing the peace; paid fine.
Dick Fallon, disturbing the peace; paid fine.
Hugh Collins, disturbing the peace; paid fine.
George Hill, disposing of mortgaged property; released on bond.
 
Ada Evening News, July 19, 1907
Raided The Picnic
Deputy Marshal Ed Brents, uninvited, attended a Negro picnic out beyond the cement works Thursday evening. He brought back to town a six-shooter, three bottles of booze, and a Negro prisoner.
 
Ada Evening News, July 24, 1907
U.S. Deputy Marshall Robert Baily[sic] of Sulphur is attending court today.
 
Ada Evening News, July 24, 1907
Sulphur's Day In Court
Judge Winn Not Very Sympathetic For Law Breakers
Today has been Sulphur's day in Judge Winn's court. W.A. Clayton, Ed Givens, and W.W. Tribil were fined $245 for conducting a gaming house. E.W. Trail is held for assault to kill. Uno Jones was placed under a $1,500 bond for carnal knowledge and seduction. The following are charged with introducing and selling and are being tried today: W.M. Otey, W.S. Janeway, Bill Knox, Otis Palmer, Houston Madden, Charley Crane, H.H. Casaday, Willis Watson, Henry Sanders, Joe Voughan, Doc Kerr, W.G. Buchanan, Crips Eastwood. Wesley Balin of the Egypt neighborhood paid a fine for disturbing public worship. The case of Buchanan was the first called for trial Wednesday. He was held to await the action of the grand jury, his bond being set at $1,000, with a piece bond of $500. Watson, Crane, and Janeway jointly are on trial this afternoon, all accused of disposing of liquor at the place known as Watson's pool hall. The clean sweep made by offices Brents and Chapman Sunday appears to have been carefully planned. The government witnesses, of whom there are a number, swear straight from the shoulder that they bought a certain amount of whiskey on a certain day from so and so. It looks as if, now, the trials may consume the greater portion of the week.
 
Ada Evening News, July 25, 1907
A Brave Officer
A bad Negro got off an early morning train at Waurika and loafed around the depot. Special officer Luster questioned him as to what he intended to do in Waurika when the Negro drew a big gun and drove the officer into the station. While Luster was telephoning for assistance the Negro got away - Kansas City Times.
 
Ada Evening News, July 30, 1907
Deputy Brents Determined
Says Sulphur Shall Be Clean Of Bootleggers
Balls Out The Bondsmen
Denounces Sympathizers With Lawless
Naturally Office Deputy United States Marshal T.E. Brents is not overly pleased with the action of the court at Ardmore last Saturday in making a sweeping reduction in the bonds of the Sulphur men whom he arrested in his recent celebrated cleanup. Neither is it gratifying to United States Commissioner Winn who heard the evidence and set the bonds conscientiously at stiff figures.
 
Brents had been especially charged by United States Marshal Porter with the task of cleaning up the Augean stable and suppressing the liquor traffic in Sulphur. He feels that he started out well and should have the co-operation of other officials and of all law abiding citizens.
 
"But just look at this paper" urged Mr. Brents as he exhibited to the reporter the document printed below. "I have taken the trouble to copy the names of the bondsmen who helped Sulphur joint keepers to get out of jail. I want the public to know just what sort of men sympathize and encourage the criminal class. I think I shall have published hereafter the names of all bondsmen who sign bonds in criminal cases."
 
"As for Sulphur," continued Mr. Brents, "I am going to clean out that bootlegging joint business over there if I have to make a raid every week - or every night."
 
"The following bonds were filed in the U.S. Clerk's office at Ada, I.T., the same being for the appearance of the following joint keepers at Sulphur, I.T., arrested July 2, on charge of selling whiskey at that place. W.S. Janeway, liquor. Bondsmen: C.E. Evertts, ex-city marshal, Sulphur, I.T.; Ed House, ex-U.S. Marshal, Sulphur, I.T.
W.M. Otey, liquor. Bondsmen: C.E. Evertts, ex-city marshal, Sulphur, I.T.; Ed House, ex-deputy U.S. marshal, Sulphur, I.T.
Houston Madden, liquor. Bondsmen: C.E. Evertts, ex-city marshal, Sulphur, I.T.; Ed House, ex-deputy U.S. marshal, Sulphur, I.T.
Bill Knox, liquor. Bondsmen: C.E. Evertts, ex-city marshal, Sulphur, I.T.; Ed House, ex-deputy U.S. marshal, Sulphur, I.T.; D.J. Kendall, Mayor, Sulphur, I.T.; Willis Watson, joint keeper, Sulphur, I.T.
Henry Sanders, liquor. Bondsmen: First State Bank, Sulphur, I.T.; C.E. Evertts, ex-city marshal, Sulphur, I.T.
Doc Kerr, liquor. Own recognizance.
Willis Watson, liquor. Bondsmen: D.F. Wheeler, joint keeper, Sulphur, I.T.; W.J. Jones, joint keeper, Sulphur, I.T.
Otis Palmer, liquor. Bondsmen: D.F. Wheeler, joint keeper, Sulphur, I.T.; W.J. Jones, joint keeper, Sulphur, I.T.
H.H. Cassady, liquor. Bondsmen: Willis Watson, joint keeper, Sulphur, I.T.; W.S. Janeway, joint keeper, Sulphur, I.T.
Charles Crane, liquor. Bondsmen: Willis Watson, joint keeper, Sulphur, I.T.; Ed House, ex-deputy U.S. marshal, Sulphur, I.T.
"This shows why officers who would enforce the law have so much trouble in doing so, violations sanctioned by officials and defendants even bonded out of jail by themselves."
 
Ada Evening News, July 30, 1907
The Census In Pontotoc
Names For This County's Enumerators Forwarded To Supervisor
T.E. Brents, who was requested by census supervisor Wm. C. Hunt to recommend to him fifteen enumerators for Pontotoc County, forwarded that number of names Monday. The appointments will probably be published Wednesday.
 
"In selecting those names to recommend," says Mr. Brents, "I endeavored absolutely to ignore politics and only suggested men capable and trustworthy. In the list there are about as many democrats as republicans, and they hail from every part of the county."
 
Probably census taking will begin in Pontotoc County before the end of this week.

 Dividing Line

Next Section - Law Enforcement Index - Newspaper Index - Home Page

[an error occurred while processing this directive]