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Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Indian Territory (OK)
January-April 1907

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

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*Ada Evening News, January 7, 1907
Deputy U.S. Marshal Chapman went to Kittie, via Tupelo, today expecting to bring back W.D. Monk, charged with killing Robt. Gibson last night.
 
*Ada Evening News, January 22, 1907
Deputy U.S. Marshal Irby and U.S. Commissioner T.N. Robinett of Ardmore are here as witnesses in the Ord Rich case. [earlier article on same page included info about Rich case in which Rich was accused of having raped about a year and a half before a woman named Mrs. Emily Latta who is since deceased.]
 
*Ada Evening News, February 1, 1907
Deputy U.S. Marshal [Robert] Bailey of Sulphur was here over night.
 
*Ada Evening News, February 2, 1907
Deputy U.S. Marshal A.R. Cottle, with the court at Ada, left for a Sunday stay in Ardmore.
 
*Ada Evening News, February 19, 1907
Back From The East
Deputy U.S. Marshal T.E. Brents is just back home from an 11 days' delightful trip to Washington and other Eastern places, including Baltimore, Cincinatti, Chicago, and the Johnstown Exposition grounds. Though still by no means complete, the Exposition buildings and grounds, he says, are already things of beauty. Every state but one has its building erected. He was ashamed to observe that Oklahoma and Texas are two of those indifferent four. Mr. Brents thinks no one can afford to miss taking in the sights of Jamestown[sic], of Washington, and others along the Potomac and the Chesapeake which the trip will offer. On his trip he was accompanied by Guy Sackett, U.S. Court stenographer.
 
*Ada Evening News, February 28, 1907
Beginning of the End of Ada's Federal Court
The letter published below would indicate Ada's career as a full fledged federal court town is already ended. It is inferable that no more grand juries will be empanelled here; that future felonious prisoners in this vicinity will be subject to the action of the Grand Juries at Ardmore, which remains a federal court town under statehood; that the June term of court at Ada will be exclusively a clearing up term which will entertain no new business. The letter in question follows:
Mr. Ed Brents
Office Deputy Marshal
Ada, Indian Territory
Dear Sir
Regarding bonds for appearance of defendants arrested on bench warrants you are respectfully advised that these bonds should be made returnable to the Ada Court June 1, 1907. U.S. Commissioner Winn has been directed to commit prisoners upon preliminary examinations for felony to answer to the Grand Jury at the U.S. Court at Ardmore on April 29, 1907, and in case these defendants execute bail that the bond be made returnable to Ardmore to answer the orders of the court in matters pending before the Grand Jury.
Very Respectfully
G.A. Porter
United States Marshal
 
*Ada Evening News, March 5, 1907
Oakman Post Office Robbed
Monday night between twelve and one o'clock robbers blew up the safe of the post office at Oakman six miles north of Ada on the Frisco and secured between $500 and $600. They got safely away and no dependable clue to their identity or whereabouts is yet reported. Deputy U.S. Marshal Brents, of the local office, has gone to the scene of the crime and it is considered probable that the robbers will be apprehended.
 
Ada Evening News, March 12, 1907
Off To Paris To Court
The Will Hendrix and the Clarence Brown murder cases are set for trial in the federal court at Paris, Tex. March 13. Today, U.S. Deputy Marshals, Brents, Cummings, and Chapman, and several others from here and a number from Stonewall left for Paris as witnesses.
The defendants are full blood Indians and took advantage of the old act of congress permitting such a change of venue.
 
Ada Evening News, March 15, 1907
Clarence Brown Pleaded Guilty
Life Sentence
Deputy U.S. Marshals, Brents, Cummings, and Chapman and Constable Morris returned last night from Paris, Texas whither they went as witnesses in the murder cases of Clarence Brown and Will Hendrix, two full blood Indians who were granted a change of venue from the Ada court on the ground that both they and the parties killed were Indians. Brown concluded to enter a plea of guilty and was given a life term in the penitentiary.
Brown was charged with murdering his mother, brother, and stepfather, six miles southeast of Jesse on Aug. 12, 1905. What he pleaded guilty to was the killing of his mother and brother. His father being a white man, the case against Clarence for killing him is still pending in the court at Ada.
The case against Hendrix, accused of killing his father-in-law was continued till October.
The Ada officers returned on the night train, which was some four hours late, due to the burning of several cars on the Frisco track near Woville[sic]. A way had to be made around the burning cars.
 
Ada Evening News, March 15, 1907
Coggins Is Dead
Ardmore, I.T., March 14 - Sidney Coggin[sic], slayer of Section Foreman Warren near Ada last week, died in the federal jail here today of self inflicted injuries. Coggin slashed his throat with a knife. The body will be taken to Denison, Texas today for burial. His mother resides in Lafayette, Texas.
 
Ada Evening News, March 18, 1907
Dr. Davenport of Oakman Is Foully Assassinated
At 8 o'clock Sunday morning the body of Dr. J.W. Davenport of Oakman was found in the southern suburbs of Francis with a bullet hole in the back of the head, which was badly powder burned. Such are the circumstances that foul play of the most dastardly nature is indubitable. Mrs. Davenport says the doctor left home Saturday night to make a professional call. About 1 o'clock a.m. a gunshot was heard in the vicinity where the body was discovered. The doctor's buggy and team, unhitched, stood nearby, the bridle rein of the nearest horse hanging down. Evidently, Dr. Davenport had unhitched the team preparatory to departing, had put up the reins of one horse and started to do the same for the other, when the assassin - probably secreted beneath the buggy - shot him from behind at close quarters. The hitching place was a wire fence, against which the victim apparently fell - judging from rents in his overcoat. Earlier rumors were to the effect that the assassin had concealed himself behind a big stump right by the team; that he was trailed to and from the scene from the place of hitching his horse not far away. But this story was negavited[sic] by later and more reliable reports. So soon as the deed was discovered people flocked to the scene in such numbers as to make it next to impossible to trail the slayer with bloodhounds or otherwise. The deceased is a prominent citizen of Pontotoc County, for a number of years a resident of this section, and is a brother of Hon. James Davenport, a leading attorney of Vinita. He was a man who had strong friends, whom he ever stood by, and some enemies. As to the identity of the assassin public suspicion as yet, points to no one.
 
Later - U.S. Deputy Marshal Cummings Monday morning brought in and lodged in the federal jail Mrs. Mary E. Brooks, arrested for the killing on complaint of the dead man's brother of Vinita. The brother arrived at the scene of the tragedy last evening bringing two famous bloodhounds - the dogs which were trailing the Wycliffe brothers at the time Deputy U.S. Marshal Gilstrap was killed by the Wycliffes. It is said the dogs, starting with a woman's track near where the deceased fell, followed the trail to Mrs. Brooks' house, several blocks away, thence to a neighbor's house where she had gone; and, further, that the fatal ball extracted from the body proved to be of 32 calibre like that carried in a Colt's pistol found in the accused woman's house. On the other hand, the woman stoutly denies any guilt or knowledge of the guilty party. She admits being an acquaintance of the deceased; that he was the family physician and occasionally visited her home. But she avers she saw nothing of him on the night of the shooting. She mingled with the crowd early Sunday morning at the scene of the crime, which might account for the trail the dogs followed. Some who were on the ground early claim to have followed the tracks of two men from the scene some two hundred yards across a branch - both of them evidently running away in the dark. And this, by some competent to judge, is considered the dependable clue. The accused woman is a comely person, 31 years of age, with two children. Her husband has been away from home as of late, working as a mill engineer. She claims he is in Bates, Ark. and that she was preparing to go to him. Her preliminary hearing will be held probably in a day or two. The crime may be said still to be shrouded in mystery. That the doctor was ambushed seems incredible, for there proves to have been no object for an assassin to hide behind. At Oakman this afternoon, the funeral was held. A number of the doctor's Ada friends, including Woodmen and Masons, of which orders he was a member, attended.
 
Ada Evening News, March 18, 1907
Deputy Marshal Chapman was in Stonewall today.
 
Ada Evening News, March 20, 1907
Deputy United States Marshal Irby, of the Ardmore office, is in the city.
 
Ada Evening News, March 22, 1907
Bond Allowed Mrs. Brooks
A telegram from Attorney Duke Stone to Deputy Marshal T.E. Brents this afternoon announces that Judge Dickerson, after receiving the testimony in chambers at Chickasha, has allowed Mrs. Mary E. Brooks bond in the sum of $1,000.
There are so many substantial citizens who do not believe the woman killed Dr. Davenport that doubtless the bondsmen will be readily forthcoming, and she be liberated from the Ardmore jail within 24 hours.
 
Ada Evening News, March 22, 1907
Found Insane
A pitiful case of insanity was tried before Judge Winn this afternoon. City Marshal Skinner of Francis brought down one Elmer Ridgel, age 17, son of a tie cutter in that community. The boy, as a result of a recent attack of typhoid, combined, perhaps, with hereditary taint, is both a helpless invalid and a lunatic. The unfortunate will be taken to Ardmore and later to the government asylum at Washington.
 
Ada Evening News, April 2, 1907
Armed Negroes Attack The Helpless Whites
Fort Worth, April 2 - At 1 o'clock yesterday morning a telephone message received here from Durant, I.T., says that an appeal had reached there for all the deputy marshals at that point to go at once to Cale station, five miles away on the Missouri, Kansas, & Texas railroad, to aid the white people who were threatened with an attack by a band of Negroes who have been to Colbert and armed themselves for the avowed purpose of avenging the lynching of Jim Williams there last night.
Williams was accused of attacking Tillie Misner, a young white woman. The white people at Cale say they have a force of seventy-five men ready to fight, but are without ammunition. The Negroes are said to be well armed and to number 300. Help will be sent at once. The marshals are now forming a posse to start for Cale.
A long distance telephone message from Cale, received at 5 o'clock in the morning, was to the effect that 100 armed men were patrolling the town.
The sheriff and a number of deputy marshals from Durant had just arrived at that time. The guard will remain on duty until daylight. The people of Cale are wild with excitement.
It is declared that the only thing that has saved the people from massacre thus far is the fact that the Negroes lack a leader.
 
 
Ada Evening News, April 4, 1907
Deputy U.S. Marshal Chapman took a Negro, R.L. Walter, to the Ardmore jail this morning. He was charged with larceny.
 
Ada Evening News, April 9, 1907
Robbers Terrorize Town And Wreck The Bank
Seminole, I.T, April 9 - While three armed men patrolled the principal street, and by a fusilade of shots prevented interruption, two others wrecked the safe of the First State Bank of this city late Sunday night, and made their escape with about $1,000 in cash. Six separate charges of nitro glycerin were exploded before the two men working on the safe succeeded in breaking it open. No one had nerve enough to shoot or attempt to capture the robbers. More than fifty shots were fired, and several people narrowly escaped being wounded. J.H. Spur, the cashier of the bank which was robbed, boards at the Howard hotel, in front of which one of the armed guards were stationed. He was awakened by the first explosion and immediately opened a window to investigate. Three shots fired at him together with a shouted warning to stay inside, caused him to lose interest in what was going on in the street. The robbers escaped east on a handcar. The interior fixtures of the bank, as well as the plate glass front, were totally wrecked by the force of the explosions. This loss, as well as that of the money stolen, is covered by insurance, and the bank opened for business as usual at 9 o'clock the next morning. S.D. Powell, president of the bank, has offered a reward of $500 for the apprehension of the robbers. Seminole is a new town and is not incorporated, although there are nearly 500 inhabitants. There is no deputy U.S. marshal located here and the Indians often make a practice of "shooting up" the town. For this reason, many people who heard the shooting last night took no interest in the affair, supposing it was nothing more than an ordinary occurrence. The Seminole County News Plant located in the rear of the wrecked bank, which belongs to Otis B. Weaver of the Ada News, was not materially effected by the explosion and will continue, without interruption the dissemination of good Democratic principles throughout Seminole County.
 
Ada Evening News, April 24, 1907
Held For Killing - Will Apply For Bail
During waking hours since Tuesday afternoon scarcely has there been a topic of conversation on the streets other than the tragedy on Main Street wherein Gus Pool died at the hands of his brother-in-law, Henry Woodward.
 
Sorrow reigns in two homes in that of Napolean Pool where lies the body of his brother; in that of Mr. Woodward, whose devoted wife lies prostrate, her heart torn with a double grief.
Promptly Wednesday forenoon the examining trial of Mr. Woodward was commenced before U.S. Commissioner U.G. Winn. Friends of the family and the curious public filled the court room.
 
The hearing lasted only until 2:10 this afternoon after the noon intermission. The defense introduced no witnesses. In all, seven witnesses were introduced by the prosecution, most of whom were cross-examined by defendant's attorney, J.F. McKeel, of Ada, and S.T. Bledsoe, or Ardmore.
 
At the conclusion of the hearing Judge Winn announced his authority compelled him either to absolutely acquit the accused or hold him over to await the action of the grand jury which convenes at Ardmore April 29, next Monday; in the meantime accused having the right to apply to the judge of the court for bail. Under the conditions, he said he felt it his duty to hold the defendant over for the action of the grand jury. Defendant's attorneys announce application will be made at once for a writ of habeas corpus, and they anticipate no trouble in securing bail and bondsmen.
 
The testimony of the various witnesses may be summarized as follows:
 
A.M. (Bud) Gregg: - Well acquainted with both Woodward and Pool; just previous to the tragedy witness, S.J. Stafford, Tom Bergman, Mr. Pegg, and deceased, Gus Pool, were near together on the sidewalk of Main Street in front of Foster's confectionary and James' cold drink place; horse swapping was the talk; Woodward came along going east and was accosted by Pegg about something; Woodward, then started on, called Bergman who went toward him; at that instant Pool sprang at Woodward and struck him with his fist about the ear a staggering blow, then went onto him, striking him again; witness rushed forward and had hands on both men when shot was fired. On cross-examination witness said Woodward's position, when first struck, was sideways to his assailant; that Pool was a large man. Woodward was smaller and had been in ill health; Pool struck two blows and Woodward one, and had hold of Woodward when shot.
 
S.J. Strafford: - Woodward was talking to Bergman when Pool struck him, knocking him six or seven feet and advanced again upon him; coming nearer witness heard gunshot and retreated into store; parties very close together; witness could not see clearly, heard no words spoken by either; Pool had no weapon.
 
Tom Bergman: - Woodward accosted witness; Pegg spoke and stopped Woodward; Woodward had turned toward witness and had his side toward Pool when struck by him about the ear; the two were close together when shot was fired; Pool advanced toward Woodward twice before shot, and two or three steps afterwards before falling.
 
Baxter Fretwell, deputy city marshal: - Was across street when attracted by pistol shot; ran immediately across, to find tragedy over; took pistol away from Woodward, he not resisting, but insisting he must go to his home at once; turned prisoner over to United States Jailor Adams, the next officer to arrive.
 
Joe Foster, proprietor of confectionary: - Saw nothing till after shooting; after which Woodward entered his store, walked to the rear and returned.
 
Dr. Runyan: - Examined body immediately and again later; ball passed through base of heart; for a few seconds after being so wounded a man might exert some of his phisical[sic] powers.
 
Dr. W. Holman: - Was three doors away when shot was fired. Nothing particularly material testified to.
 
A. Vogt: - Was too far away to see much.
 
Notes of the Tragedy
It so happened the G.A. Porter, U.S. Marshal Southern District, just arrived from Ardmore, was the first officer of high authority on the scene.
 
It was a pathetic scene at the courthouse when Rube Woodward, of Maud, Okla., embraced his brother Henry.
 
The funeral will be held Thursday. Relatives from Texas are awained[sic].
 
Ada Evening News, April 24, 1907
E.C. Sullivan For Constable
Subject to the action of the Democratic primary, E.C. Sullivan announces sor[sic] the office of Constable in Chickasaw township, No. 2, the country township which surrounds Ada. The News takes pleasure in assuring the people - those few who may not know it - that Ed Sullivan would make an excellent officer. Having lived in the county eighteen years, during which time, he has been prominent in the up-building of the community, nearly everybody knows him and he knows nearly everybody. Words of commendation from the News were almost superfluous. Ed Sullivan is of the right age, the right build, and the stamina to make an officer who would preserve the peace in the community. Knowing this, his neighbors have insisted that he make the race. Mr. Sullivan is one of our best farmers and is the efficient secretary of the county farmer's union also he is one of our best Democrats. The party could not do better than to nominate him.
 
Ada Evening News, April 27, 1907
Charged With Abducting 15 Year Old Girl
Report reached Ada last night that Andy Ryan and Miss Myrtle McAnnally, a fifteen-year-old neighbor girl, had both disappeared from the Bebee neighborhood. Miss McAnnally left home in the afternoon, telling her mother that she was going a short way to a neighbor's for a visit. It is supposed that she was met in the woods by Ryan, that they went to Tyrola and there took the Kay train to Oklahoma City. Complaint against Ryan was filed in the United States Marshal's office at Ada and the Oklahoma City police were notified to be on the lookout for the pair. They were apprehended at three o'clock this morning at a hotel where they were spending the night, and are being held by the Oklahoma City police awaiting the arrival of Deputy United States Marshal Robert Cummings, who went there this afternoon to bring the runaways to Ada. The preliminary hearing will be held Monday before Commissioner Winn.
 
Ada Evening News, April 29, 1907
Andy Ryan Bound Over To Grand Jury
Andy Ryan and Miss Myrtle McAnnally were brought in Sunday morning by Deputy United States Marshal Cummings. They eloped Saturday from Bebee and were apprehended that night in Oklahoma City. Ada marshals were notified and done the work of locating them and having them arrested and held. Sunday afternoon Mr. Ryan was arraigned before Commissioner Winn. He plead guilty and was bound over to await the action of the grand jury which convened in Ardmore Monday. The charges against him were adultery and having carnal knowledge of a young lady under the age of sixteen, the age of consent. His bond was fixed at $1,000 on each of these charges, and he was taken to Ardmore to appear before the grand jury Monday. Attorneys King and Currie and Duke Stone appeared for the defendant. A large crowd of curious people from both town and country awaited the arrival of the couple from Oklahoma City, and stayed close to the courthouse from that time until the hearing in the afternoon at 2 o'clock. It is a very sad case. The mother of the young lady was heard to say: "This is the first trouble we ever had in our family. I would rather have buried her." Close on to $2,000 cash was found on Ryan's person when he was arrested. It is the prevalent opinion that it was the couple's intention to leave the country for good.

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