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Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Indian Territory (OK)
July-December 1906

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

 

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Ada Evening News, July 6, 1906
No Report On Lynching
Chickasha, OK July 5 - The grand jury that was summoned yesterday to investigate the lynching at Womack examined a large number of witnesses this morning but adjourned at noon till three o'clock without making any report to the court. A large number of people have been summoned from Womack. They report that all has quieted down there.
 
Ada Evening News, July 6, 1906
Fired Bullets Into Wrong Man's House
Becoming filled up on wild cat booze, one Caldwell and another party whose name could not be learned, fired their sixshooters into the houses of slumbering citizens and farmers near McGee early Friday morning, and as a fitting consequence Caldwell is dead and the other party in the hands of the law. This is the story phoned in from McGee early this morning. Caldwell and his companion had presumably been to the Corner Saloon, as a jug partially filled with booze was found hanging to the saddle horn. Becoming warmed up from the effects of the liquor they decided to have some sport and as they passed a farmer's house they would give him an early morning salute by firing bullets promiscuously into his home. When they arrived opposite the residence of Loss Hart, one mile west of McGee, they started the fusilade, when Hart stepped to the door and shot Caldwell dead. Caldwell's partner attempted to make his escape but Hart mounting the dead outlaw's horse soon overtook him and the would-be bad man gave up without a struggle. Federal officers here were notified of the killing, but owing to the fact that it occurred in the Pauls Valley district the authorities there were asked to take charge of affairs. Los[sic] Hart is well-known to almost everyone in the Southwest. It is he, who seven years ago, killed the famous outlaw, Bill Dalton, at Elk, Hart at that time being a deputy United States marshal. He is absolutely fearless and can take care of himself in any company. He is peaceable and a good neighbor and the affair of this morning will no doubt pass with the usual investigation.
 
Ada Evening News, July 6, 1906
No Report On Lynching
Chickasha, IT July 5 - The grand jury that was summoned yesterday to investigate the lynching at Womack examined a large number of witnesses this morning but adjourned at noon till three o'clock without making any report to the court. A large number of people have been summoned from Womack. They report that all has quieted down there.
 
*Ada Evening News, July 7, 1906
Deputy's Good Haul
Muskogee IT, July 7 - John Cordell, deputy U.S. marshal at Wewoka, will receive for the past fiscal year $2,500 which is $1,000 more than any other field deputy in the western district will get. The field deputies are on the fee system, but they are limited to $1,500 per year and when their fees are in excess of that the excess must be turned in to the government. On account of the difficult and dangerous work in the Wewoka district, Cordell is allowed $1,000 more than the other deputies, provided his fees amount to that much. His fees are over the $2,500 mark.
 
*Ada Evening News, July 7, 1906
Wounded Man Dies
Ardmore, IT July 7 - Del Gibson, who was shot by City Marshal Bud Moore, at Mill Creek on June 15, died yesterday of his wounds. Gibson was intoxicated and resisting arrest and in the fight he was shot through the body by the officer.
 
*Ada Evening News, July 9, 1906
Hart Exonerated
Ardmore IT July 9 - United States Commissioner William Pfeiffer has discharged T.L. Hart, a well known farmer of the McGee section on the plea of justifiable homicide. Hart, who is an ex-deputy marshal, shot and killed Ransom Caldwell, also a farmer, on Friday.
 
*Ada Evening News, July 13, 1906
Government's Tasters Testify It's Intoxicating
South McAlester, July 13 - James House, who is alleged to have sold "Long Horn" in this city this past week was bound over to await the action of the grand jury in the sum of $350.
 
Last Saturday deputy marshal Cassidy selected some tasters to taste Long Horn. The testers drank fifty bottles and decided that it was an intoxicant; upon their evidence commissioner McMillan bound House over.
 
Notwithstanding this decision F.J. McFarland gave away sample bottles of "Teetotal" last night. He will sell the beverage this summer, that is if the court takes no step to prevent him. There has been no test case made of "Teetotal". The probability is that it will be excluded just as "Long Horn" has been excluded by the decision of commissioner McMillan. There is being fixed up in this city a very elaborate bar for the sale of Ino and Uno. The manufacturers of these liquors claim that if "Teetotal" can be sold their products also come within the scope of non-intoxicants. The "Uno" joint-to-be will be fitted up as a fine bar. The fixtures are already here and the proprietor is working day and night in order to take advantage of the present hot weather spell.
 
*Ada Evening News, July 13, 1906
Lynching Of Negro Narrowly Averted
Duncan, I.T., July 13 - Joe Allen a yellow Negro about 20 years old, was placed in the Federal jail here this morning about two o'clock, charged with criminal intent upon the person of Mrs. A.P. Harris, living five miles northwest of Caddo. Thursday morning about 9 o'clock as she was attending to her daily household work a Negro came to the front door and asked for a sack to carry money he had found in a nearby thicket. Mrs. Harris replied she had no sack and then he asked her to come and go with him and he would give her some of the money. She wanted to Negro to go away. He then pointed a single barreled shotgun taking a single step forward, then Mrs. Harris screamed. The Negro took fright and ran away. Mrs. Harris, after her recovery from her fright, rant to her husband, who was plowing in a field near by. Mr. Harris immediately notified the neighbors. A posse was formed to search for the Negro. Four found in a nearby field were brought before Mrs. Harris, but were not identified.
A second search found Allen in a cabin on Amos Bass' farm. He was brought before Mrs. Harris and positively identified by her and her little daughter. He was taken to Caddo and placed in the city jail.
Excitement was high in Caddo all the afternoon. Three to four hundred people closed around the jail, cool heads preventing a lynching. Five United States Marshalls[ci] from this city left for Caddo and took charge of the Negro at 9 o'clock.
Large crowds were on the streets armed with shotguns, and lynching was talked freely. At intervals there was firing of guns.
The Marshals stole the Negro out of jail and landed Allen safe in jail here. He will be given a preliminary trial in the United States Court this morning. Great excitement and interest prevails in this city.
 
*Ada Evening News, August 3, 1906
Waylaid & Killed
Prominent Indian Riddled With Bullets From Ambush
Tishomingo IT Aug 2 - Ben Collins, a member of the Indian Police and sergeant at arms of the last Chickasaw house of representatives, was shot and killed about 9 o'clock last night near his home, eight miles east of Tishomingo. Collins had just placed an allottee in possession of his land and was returning home when he was waylaid and killed. His wife heard the shooting and she and a boy went out and found the body about 100 yards from the house. Collins lived a few minutes after being shot, but never spoke. Marshal Jones is investigating the murder.
 
*Ada Evening News, August 7, 1906
Accused Negroes Are Spirited Away To Muskogee
Tulsa IT Aug 6 - Prompt action on the part of officers prevented the possible lynching tonight of the three Negroes, Jackson, Murray, and Howell, accused of the outrage and murder of Harry Priester. The city was thrown into a wild state of excitement by sensational developments in the case which showed that the boy had been murdered with the bone of a horse's leg. Angry murmurs were heard on every street corner and fearing that nightfall might usher in a tragedy, the officers spirited the prisoners to the afternoon Katy train and hurried them to the federal jail at Muskogee. Eugene McQueen, who gave the information leading to the arrest of the accused, was set upon by a mob of Negroes in West Tulsa last night, beaten into insensibility and left to die. He revived during the night, and badly wounded, managed to get to the office of Deputy United States Marshal Hanna at Sapulpa this morning to ask protection. While Hanna stepped aside a moment, McQueen disappeared and has not been seen since.
 
Ada Evening News, August 15, 1906
AHTA Will Convene In Ada On October 4
The Indian Territory division of the A.H.T.A. will hold a session in Ada on the fourth Wednesday of October. There will be a meeting of the district association here September 1st for the purpose of making preparations for the meeting. C.S. Owens, vice president of the district association, left yesterday to attend a meeting of the state constitutional committee. The occasion of the state association meeting in Ada will be a big affair and it is no small compliment to the city. The citizens of the town will make ample provisions for the entertainment of the visitors
 
*Ada Evening News, August 15, 1906
Clever Ruse of Officers Lands Two Persons In Jail
Thursday there was placed in the federal jail a woman, Edna Taylor, alias Edna Moore, by name, and thereby hangs a tale.
Edna Taylor up until January 1 last, lived with her husband at Tulsa, but becoming weary of his intentions she eloped with another man, Carter, whom the federal officers had suspicions was not dealing exactly on the square as regards the liquor laws. In order to establish the fact, Deputy Marshal Cummings and Constable Morris began a systematic investigation. They proceeded to the tent of the supposed bootlegger near the railroad grade south of Midland, and told the woman who answered their call that they were whiskey peddlers and had a load in the brush and would dispose of a portion of it. The woman readily fell into the trap and became very communicative, explaining that her companion was an efficient whiskey peddler; how the revenuers piled up and that he was off for a load of the liquid at that time. The two men sat there and the vulnerable woman talked. She told them of her trials and tribulations; of her unpleasant marital relations and laid bare before them her skeleton closet.
At a reasonable hour the officers informed the woman that they would bring in the booze and departed in the brush. Here they lay in wait and in a short time Carter made his appearance and was at once taken into custody. Six quarts were found in a gunny sack.
The woman in the case followed the officers and her paramour into Ada, later going to Roff and Sulphur where she was arrested on the charge of adultery.
 
August 17, 1906
Officer's Baffled
Apparently They Have Given Up The Chase of the Wycliffs[sic]
Muskogee, IT Aug 17 - The officers of the Northern District have apparently given up hope of capturing the Wycliffs. Henry Holderman, a Cherokee, was in the city yesterday. He knows the Wycliffs, and sees them occasionally. He states the reason the officers and other people fail to see the Wycliffs, though they have remained in the same section all summer, is that they guard every highway closely and no sooner does a person start along any road than some friend by signal lets the Wycliffs know. The outlaws then hide in the brush and boulders, and a person may ride within ten feet of them and never suspect their presence. He says hundreds of times people looking for the Wycliffs have been within a few yards of them and did not know it, while the Wycliffs would be keeping watch on them all the time. It looks like the outlaws were going to make good on their avowed intention of not being arrested until there is a state government and the present regime of federal officials in the Northern District has passed away.
 
*Ada Evening News, September 1, 1906
ABSTRACT
J.R. Lawrence For Delegate
served at one time as Indian Police
 
Ada Evening News, September 4, 1906
Legislature Convenes And Organizes At Tishomingo
Tishomingo, I.T., Sept. 4 - Chickasaw Legislature convened here yesterday and effected an organization. Thomas Short of Kemp, was elected sergeant at arms of the House to fill the vacancy left by the death of Ben Collins. The message of Gov. Johnston will probably be transmitted to the Legislature today.
 
Ada Evening News, September 6, 1906
Andy Scribner and family, of Allen, are visiting Mr. Scribner's brother, John, this week.
 
*Ada Evening News, September 8, 1906
Mr. McCoin, chief deputy marshal of Ardmore, was transacting business in our city this morning.
 
*Ada Evening News, September 17, 1906
U.S. Deputy Marshal Ed Brents arrested four Negroes Sunday evening on the Katy track for selling liquor. Their names are John Brown, Johnson Brown, Newt Foster, and Almus Brown.
 
Ada Evening News, November 2, 1906
Clarence Lee who has been the guest of John Scribner left today for his home at Citra.
 
*Ada Evening News, November 3, 1906
Ardmore, IT Nov 2 - Deputy Marshal C.A. Hahn has lodged Dan Sie in the federal jail charged with complicity in connection with the killing of Indian Policeman Ben Collins, who was assassinated near Milburn a short time ago. Sie is a well known farmer of Sugden section. This makes the third arrest in connection with the killing, A. Washmood, an insurance agent and Henry Pruitt having been placed in jail last week.
 
*Ada Evening News, November 7, 1906
Muskogee IT Nov. 6 - To Indian Territory belongs the distinction and dishonor of having in the United State Penitentiary at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, the model prisoner of the place, and the most untractable prisoner also. The former is Ben Reeves, a young Negro sent up for the murder of his wife, and the other prisoner is Lee Voss, also a Negro. The officers of the penitentiary state that there has never been a better behaved prisoner in that penitentiary than young Reeves. He is a son of Bas[sic] Reeves, a Negro deputy marshal at Muskogee, who has been in the government service twenty years. Young Reeve shot his wife and killed her in a fit of jealous anger. He was arrested and placed in jail by his own father. He got a life sentence. Lee Voss was sent up three years for robbery on a five year sentence. He will not work and sulks all the time. The prison officials seem unable to tame him at all. The most effective method has been to starve him to work. A pile of stones about a wheelbarrow full are put into his cell. He is then given a stonebreaker and left to himself. He will not touch the hammer and stone until hunger drives him to it. The warden will not give him a mouthful to eat until he has broken all the stone to a certain size. When this is done Voss gets a ration and if he still refuses to work another pile of stone is brought and the process repeated. Even with this drastic measure the prison officials have never been able to get much work out of Voss.
 
*Ada Evening News, November 14, 1906
ABSTRACT
Desperado Captured After Thrilling Chase
mentions U.S. Marshal Abernathy and Deputy Marshal Buck Lancaster
 
Ada Evening News, November 16, 1906
Negro Landlord Slain By His White Tenant
Thursday afternoon about twelve miles northwest of Ada, between Bebee and Corner, a white man named Lige Burleson shot and killed a Negro named Doshie Black.
Burleson was a renter on Black's place and the tragedy occurred in the cornfield. Officers Brents and Adams, as soon as notified, left for the scene of the killing. They did not find Burleson but were reliably informed he was on his way to Ada to surrender himself. He failing to show up, however, the officers went in search of him again, Friday morning. At 3:30 they had not returned.
There are two quite contradictory stories of the trouble. One to the effect that the Negro was the aggressor and had made a habit of bulldozing his tenant; the other story is that the deceased was merely remonstrating with Burleson about the way the latter was handling the corn harvest in which both were interested, when, without adequate provocation, Burleson seized his gun from his wagon and shot the Negro through the heart.
 
Ada Evening News, November 16, 1906
Judge Clayton Very Ill
South McAlester, I.T., Nov. 16 - As a mark of sympathy for Judge W.H. Clayton, who's life is at death's door, the United States Court of Appeals adjourned until Nov. 23 and the district court until Dec. 3.
 
Ada Evening News, November 16, 1906
O'Possum Hunt
A crowd consisting of B.A. Eaton, and wife, Mrs. M.B. Donaghey, Dock, Jim, Nannie, and May Couch, John Scribner, and sister, Myrtle Sewell, and Archie Clark, went about a mile and a half east of Ada Thursday evening on an o'possum hunt. They report a good time and two animals.
 
*Ada Evening News, November 19, 1906
Charged With Killing Three
Muskogee IT Nov 18 - Ira D. Campbell, charged with having shot and killed George Sullivan, Marion Warren, the son-in-law of the latter, and a Negro preacher, a spectator, named Thomas Field, at Taft yesterday evening, surrendered to Bud Ledbetter, deputy marshal, this morning and was brought to this city where he was placed in jail.
 
Ada Evening News, December 6, 1906
Some Cotton Yet
Bob Nester, the Nester of Ahloso; paid the news a call today. He reports considerable sickness in his community and a lot of cotton yet to pick...
 
*Ada Evening News, December 8, 1906
Caught Red Handed
Officers Bring In Two Men And Cargo of Liquor
Deputy U.S. Marshal Brents brought in two alleged whiskey peddlers Saturday, Boss Whitley and Jim Williams. Mr. Brents tells the story of their capture: He had information of their meanderings. Friday night he lay in wait at the river ford three miles north of Francis. About 2 o'clock in the morning the parties appeared on the other side and proceeded to ford the stream. Before they got across their buggy stuck in the mud and they had to wade out, carrying their contraband goods. When they reached dry land they fell into the arms of the officers. Their cargo consisted of 63 pints and 3 or 4 jugs. The prisoners were released today giving each a bond of $1,000.
 
*Ada Evening News, December 10, 1906
An Alcoholic Ride
Office Deputy U.S. Marshal Brents had an eventful trip Sunday from Denison, Texas to Ada. Enroute he smashed 25 or 30 gallons of liquor. He had not been on the train long after crossing Red River before he smelled whiskey. Ed, like many of his calling, is addicted to what might be termed whiskeyphobia. Accordingly he proceeded to prohibitionize the whole train. Many a passenger was received of a pint or a quart and he took charge of two or three grips which fairly sloshed with the contraband beverage but had no owner. It is said Brents started in at the rear of the train and - tidings of smashing having preceded him - when he reached the smoker most of the boys had already drunk theirs and did not care for a frisk or anything else.
 
*Ada Evening News, December 19, 1906
Counterfeiter Killed
South McAlester, IT Dec. 19 - A telephone message from Bokoshe, stated that Monday night Deputy United States Marshal Gray and Ira H. Stevens ran across John McClain and a man named Malone in a lonely house in the woods, making counterfeit money. McClain opened fire on Gray and was shot and killed by the marshal.
 
Ada Evening News, December 22, 1906
Killed Near Sasakwa
Holdenville, IT Dec 21 - Jack Foster, a Negro was shot and killed at Little River near Sasakwa Thursday morning. Brannon brothers, white men, camping nearby were arrested by a deputy marshal from Sasakwa on suspicion. Several Negroes told the marshal that the Brannons committed the crime. They both stoutly denied their guilt. They have borne good reputations.

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