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Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Indian Territory (OK)
May-June 1906

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

 

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*Ada Evening News, May 7, 1906
Young Man of Sulphur Stabbed To The Heart
Charged with the murder of a nineteen year old boy, ten men now languish in the U.S. Prison at Ada. The tragedy occurred in a cider joint in the town of Sulphur about 3:30 Sunday morning. The deceased at the time was running the joint for his brother who is serving a jail sentence. He was found in the room stabbed in the heart and cut and bruised about the head and arm. The accused parties, it is said, were all drinking heavily in the place at the time. One of the accused is an Indian named John Hickman, the other nine belong to a Sante Fe construction crew and pass by these names: Kahn Boen, Arthur Aires, Scottie, Rabbitt, Kelley, Collins, Hobo Ryan, Tom Murphy and Bill Bryant. Dero Duncan, the deputy U.S. marshal at Sulphur, brought in Hickman, Murphy, and Bryant Sunday morning. Deputies Cummings and Chapman accompanied him back to Sulphur and during the night they apprehended the other seven and brought them hither this forenoon. The officers state there are fifteen or twenty witnesses who will appear at the preliminary trial which is set for next Friday. Further particulars could not be secured at this time.
 
Ada Evening News, May 9, 1906
Officers Raid "The Flats"
Bill Watson's popular Negro hostelry down in "the Flats" looked like part of a "deserted village" this morning. It was all but untenanted. Most of the boarders and proprietors were in jail - that's the reason. Tuesday night the U.S. marshal's force and the city marshal's force organized a vagrant hunt and swooped down upon Bill's boarding house. They bagged six women and five men, all colored. The city took charge of the women and the federal officers took in custody the men, and all were thrown in prison, some on charges of conducting a bawdy house nuisance, others on charges of lewd vagrancy, etc. Four of the women pleaded guilty in mayor's court this morning and immediately afterward were arrested on federal warrants. Both the federal and city officials are determined to stamp out vagrancy in this community. There are now eighteen prisoners in the U.S. jail and Office Deputy Brents gives warning that there are likely to be more before another sunrise.
 
Ada Evening News, May 10, 1906
Taken To Ardmore
Deputy U.S. Marshals Chapman and Brents took four of the colored women to Ardmore today to serve out a sentence given them in court here yesterday.
 
Ada Evening News, May 10, 1906
Underwent An Operation
City Marshal Lem Mitchell underwent an operation today. He is getting along nicely and will be able to resume his duties in a few days.
 
*Ada Evening News, May 16, 1906
U.S. Marshal Ambushed And Shot In Breast
Coalgate, IT May 16 - Last Sunday a man came to Coalgate and shot up the town and when Deputy Marshal Bradshaw attempted to arrest him he compelled him to drop his pistol at the point of a Winchester. Monday night as he was in search of the party, Bradshaw was ambushed by four men who began firing on him. He returned fire until his ammunition was exhausted when he retreated with a wound in his left breast. Hearing of the difficulty, a posse from this city started to the scene, and when about three miles from the city they were assailed by a party armed with a Winchester, who compelled them to return in haste. A large force of United States Marshals and citizens are searching the woods for the gang and it is thought their capture is only a matter of a few hours. It was reported in surrounding towns that Bradshaw had been killed and his many friends will be glad to learn that he is very much alive, his wound being but slight.
 
*Ada Evening News, May 16, 1906
Court News
Deputy U.S. Marshal Brents and his entire force left on the north bound Frisco train Saturday afternoon...Marshal Brents arrested Will Herron, seven miles southwest of Ada, who is charged with slander. He was held by the commissioners to await the action of the grand jury. He was taken to Ardmore last night.
 
Ada Evening News, May 17, 1906
One of Wycliffe Gang Gives Up And Confesses
Pryor Creek, I.T. May 17 - A report has reached here that Deputies Walfford, Dick, and Long arrested Ben Hungary, a full blood Cherokee, near the Mayes ferry on Grand River ten miles east of this place Tuesday. Ben Hungary was reported with the Wycliffes at the time Deputy Ike Gilstrap was killed and it is said that he told parties on Saline Creek that he was the man who killed Gilstrap. He was on his way to Pryor Creek with Ben Birdehopper to give himself up when he was overtaken by the officers and carried back east where it is thought the Wycliffes are in rendezvous. Hungary was wearing the hat that Andy Dick lost in the recent fight with the Wycliffs[sic] which lends color to the story that he was with them when Gilstrap was killed. Hungary's reason for giving himself up is best expressed in his own words. He said, "All time hungry and come to Pryor Creek to get something to eat."


Vinita I.T. May 17 - United States Marshal W.H. Darrough returned with a posse last evening from the Spavinaw Hills with Ben Hungry and Ned Carselute, alleged accomplices of the Wycliffe brothers, full blood Cherokee Indian outlaws. The prisoners were placed in the United States jail last night charged with complicity in the murder of Deputy United States Marshals I.L. Gilstrap and J.H. Vier. John Smith and his full blood Nighthawks, who are working under Marshal Darrough got on the trail of the Wycliffs[sic] and sent for the bloodhounds and went on after the band, and up to this time have not been able to force a battle with them. Hungry made a statement to Marshal Darrough in which he said he was with the Wycliffes[sic] when they killed Deputy Gilstrap and had been scouting with the Wycliffes since Gilstrap was killed. He claims he was present but took no part in the fight. Hungry claims the Wick[sic] forced him to stay with them after the fight and threatened to kill him if he left them.
 
Ada Evening News, May 19, 1906
Court Notes
Deputy U.S. Marshal Brents and his entire force left on the northbound Frisco Saturday afternoon.
There are five prisoners in jail.
Calvin Adkins was arrested near Maxwell on a charge of intent to kill. His case was continued until May 22.
Jack Self was arrested on an indictment charged with carrying a weapon. He was released on bond.
John Brown, living one mile northeast of Maxwell, is in jail charged with adultery.
Marshal Brents arrested Will Herron, seven miles southwest of Ada, who is charged with slander. He was held by the commissioner to await the action of the grand jury. He was taken to Ardmore last night.
J.E. Guier is out on bond. He left for Stonewall where wife No. 2 is staying.
 
Ada Evening News, May 22, 1906
Marshal Brents is confined to his home by illness. His friends hope to see him out in a few days.
 
Ada Evening News, May 23, 1906
Court Notes
Marshal Brents is able to be at his office again after a few days prostration caused by over exertion.
The following cases have been set for trial Saturday: Leach brothers, charged with introducing; J.R. Carroll, charged with introducing and selling. One hundred and eighty-nine bottles of whiskey were found in his possession all of which were broken.
 
Ada Evening News, May 23, 1906
Raided Gambling Dens
One evening recently Marshals Brents, Chapman, Adair and Cummings of this place, Chief Deputy McCain and O.W. Cottle of Ardmore, Burton of Mill Creek, and Duncan of Sulphur, raided seven gambling houses at Sulphur. They caught twenty-seven men who were fined $25 each. The men who were running the houses were fined $50. All of their furniture was burned and destroyed. In each of these houses a poker game was in progress and as the men were caught unawares consternation reigned for awhile. The federal officers are determined to break up their gambling dens.
 
Ada Evening News, May 23, 1906
Officers Tried
Recently officers Virgil Hennigar and Bone Hardin arrested an Indian. The latter preferred charges against them for making a false arrest and they were tried yesterday before a jury and were acquitted.
 
*Ada Evening News, May 24, 1906
Fatal Duel Between Officer And Ex-Outlaw
Guthrie, OK May 24 - John R. Abernathy, U.S. Marshal, received a telegram yesterday morning announcing that Deputy Marshal James Bourland of Anadarko, had been shot and fatally wounded by Fred Hudson, the ex-outlaw and former member of the Bert Casey band of desperadoes. Hudson was also shot by Bourland and will die. Hudson was only recently released from custody being acquitted of the killing of Deputy Marshal Lute Houston near Swan Lake in 1892. He was held however as a witness against Jim and Ben Hughes who were also acquitted of the killing Tuesday at Hobart. But little is known here, as yet, regarding the double killing yesterday at Anadarko. Bourland was a very popular officer, and for five years past his life has been threatened by outlaws. He was a candidate for the next democratic nomination for sheriff of Caddo County, but has served as deputy marshal for several years. Fred Hudson came into prominence three years ago by killing Bert Casey, the outlaw king at Cleo Springs, Hudson being commissioned as a deputy marshal in order to capture Casey dead or alive. A few months ago he was acquitted in Arkansas of murdering a man.
 
Ada Evening News, May 25, 1906
Marshal Brents is at home sick today
 
Ada Evening News, May 25, 1906
Taken To Texas
Luther Jeffries was arrested yesterday by Marshal Brents. He was wanted at Bonham, Texas for stealing a horse three years ago. An officer from Bonham came here and got him last night.
 
Ada Evening News, May 26, 1906
Marshal Brents is some better today.
 
*Ada Evening News, May 28, 1906
Family Feud Results In Battle With Knives
At a party near the town of Maxwell last Saturday night two brothers named Albert and George Buchanan had a serious difficulty with two other brothers named Tobe and Bud McClure. One of the Buchanans was hurt to some extent and Tobe McClure received a serious knife cut. None of the injuries appear to be fatal. The trouble occurred at the home of Mr Bean, three miles northeast of Maxwell. The origin of the difficulty is not known, but Deputy U.S. Marshal Chapman who went to the scene Sunday after making an investigation place George Buchanan under arrest, and it is reported that his brother Albert has skipped. All of the combatants are young men of the community and the Buchanans are old settlers in that neighborhood.
 
Ada Evening News, June 1, 1906
Extravagance of the Dead
Burial customs were once modest with our people. But complicated and costly living appears to have made simple dying impossible, remarks the New York Mail. We run to weak ostentation in the surroundings and trappings of mortality. It is necessary to obtain this, to purchase that; it is the only good form, nothing else will do. It is the consideration of the living that we think about, not the simple respect due the dead. We forget that the costlier the earthly memorial we erect the shallower may be the record that we cut upon the tablets of our hearts.
 
Ada Evening News, June 2, 1906
Foully Assassinated While He Lay In Bed
At his home in Violet Friday night between eleven and twelve o'clock, Andy Morrison was assassinated. As reported, the killing was a dastardly deed. While he lay in bed he was shot by unknown parties, the bullet coming through the door and penetrating the left breast. Such was the intelligence received over phone this morning by Office Deputy U.S. Marshal Ed Brents. He was in communication with the officers of Pottowatomie County, Oklahoma who are on the scene and desired the Ada bloodhounds to trail the assassin. Violet is a small village over in Oklahoma about eighteen miles north of Ada. Morrison was a well-known business man in that community, formerly in business at Konowa and was once a deputy sheriff of Pottowatomie County.
 
Ada Evening News, June 2, 1906
Deputy Marshal Brents, who has been confined to his bed for several days, suffering much from a serious affliction of the feet, is much improved and expects to be out again in a day or two.
 
Ada Evening News, June 6, 1906
A Horrible Murder
At 6:30 o'clock this evening Ed Brents returned from his search of the dead body of Sloan Johnson. His body was found one-fourth of a mile from Tim Blankenship's house, shot through the back, a shotgun charge doing the deadly work. The shot entered the back to the left of the shoulder blade and to the right of the spinal column. Blankenship has been arrested as an accomplice.
 
Ada Evening News, June 6, 1906
Claimed He Killed A Man And Asked To Be Arrested
Sam Melville, a half blood Indian living six miles south of Ada, came into town this morning and went to the U.S. marshal's office and said he had killed a man and wanted to give himself up. He was promptly put in jail and Marshal Brents went to the scene where the Indian said the killing took place, but a thorough search failed to reveal the body. Melville told the News reporter that there had been bad feeling between him and a full blood Indian named Sloan Johnson, for sometime. Last night they were at the home of a neighbor's, Mr. Blankenship, where he was informed Johnson had threatened to kill him. Both men started home about ten o'clock and while going through a woods Melville claimed he saw Johnson reach for his gun. No words passed but Melville said he reached for his gun and shot first. He said Johnson fell from his horse without saying a word but he felt sure he had killed him. He said he rode on home and this morning came in and gave himself up. When asked if he had ever been in trouble before he said: "No; that's what I have always kept out of. I am twenty-four years old and have never been in trouble before." He is a fine looking fellow of seemingly more than ordinary intelligence. Marshal Brents drove out to the woods again this afternoon and is still searching for the body.
 
*Ada Evening News, June 19, 1906
Died of Pneumonia
W.H. Chapman died at his residence in this city this Tuesday morning of pneumonia after an illness of but a few days duration. He leave four orphan children, their mother having died about two months ago. Mr. Chapman had held the position of federal jailer since the first of January. He was a brother of John Chapman, deputy U.S. marshal, a position held by his father before him. The family are pioneers of the Indian Territory. The remains will be taken to Stonewall tomorrow where interment will be in the afternoon.
 
*Ada Evening News, June 23, 1906
Arrested for Murder
Albert Lefley and Tom Riley were arrested Friday by Wm. Grace and Deputy Marshal Sanders charged with the murder of A.J. Morrison who lived at Konawa but who owned a saloon at Violet, O.T. and who was found lying on his cot in the saloon dead from a bullet wound. The fatal shot was supposed to have been fired by parties who opened the door of the saloon and killed their victim in his sleep. Morrison ran a very respectable saloon and had no enemies so far as we know. The murder occurred about six weeks ago.
 
Ada Evening News, June 23, 1906
Clayton and Gill Chosen
Justice W.H.H. Clayton and Joseph A. Gill of the supreme court of the Indian Territory have been selected to district the Indian Territory for the election of delegates to the constitutional convention. Their appointment has been decided by on by Attorney General Moody in conference with the president. Their duties will not extend beyond the districting of the territory for constitutional delegates.

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