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Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Indian Territory (OK)
March-April 1906

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

 

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*Ada Evening News, March 12, 1906
U.S. Court Convenes For Spring Term
The big crash about the court house Monday morning was ample evidence of the convening of court for its spring term of three weeks.
Judge Dickerson and his official retinue all reached Ada before noon. At the hour of two in the afternoon the judge ascended the bench and the court crier formally opened the session.
After the petit jury was called and qualified, the grand jury was called and sworn in. The latter is composed of the following good citizens:
J.C. Cates[?/Oates?], foreman, Littleton Davis, Joe Smith, Jim Chandler, Wm. McKoy, R.R. Brown, A.B. Yeager, George H. Henley, John Barringer, John C. Roff, Robert Dowdy, N.P. Butler, A.W. Cope, J.C. Rhea, J.H. Thompson, L.D. Kirsey.
The judge began his charge to the grand jury by reminding them that their selection was complimentary to themselves, inasmuch as it was the duty of jury commissioners to choose the very best men of the community. He cautioned the jurymen to scrutinize the motives of prosecuting witnesses appearing before them, for fear of wronging the innocent and siding false prosecution. As required by law the court specially charged them to investigate violations of the laws protecting mortgages and commercial paper. However, he enjoined them not to permit the court machinery to be imposed upon by creditors, seeking to collect their debts; they were reminded that the grand jury was no collection agency. Also the statutes prohibitory of weapons, gaming and intoxicating liquor were emphasized. This criminal trio, the source of so much trouble in the territory, came in for a most bitter denunciation at the hands of the judge.
J.C. Cates was appointed foreman and H.W. Sublett bailiff of the grand jury, which then retired to its sittings. R.A. Howard, Deputy U.S. Attorney, is here from Ardmore to attend the jury.
The first week of the court will be given to civil cases, and for Monday is assigned the probate docket composed of 230 cases.
Other court officers from out of town are: W.W. Trask of Marietta, journal clerk; C.G. Moore, probate clerk; Guy Sackett, stenographer; Col. Thomas Smith, court crier.

*Ada Evening News, March 13, 1906
Cherokee Outlaws Kill Three Deputy Marshals
Vinita, I.T., March 13 - At an early hour Monday morning, while Deputy United States Marshal I.L. Gilstrap, Otis Tittle, and Dick Carey, of Vinita, and Than Wofford, Pleas Mann, and Andy Dick of Tahlequah, I.T., were following their bloodhounds from the marshal's office in this place, trying to find the Wickliffe gang of full blood Cherokee Indian outlaws on Little Saline Creek, twenty-five miles southeast of this place, they were suddenly fired upon from ambush by the Wickliffe boys, and as soon as the smoke cleared away Deputy Gilstrap, Tittle, and Carey were found dead on the ground and Deputies Than Wofford, Andy Dick, and Pleas Mann rode rapidly away among a hail of bullets from the outlaws, who were hidden behind stones. The horses were killed at the same time the officers were.
 
The Wickliffe boys are desperate fullblood[sic] Cherokee Indians and were at one time peaceable and quiet citizens. They attended the Cherokee schools and are well educated. Their father was at one time one of the Supreme Judges of the Cherokee Nation and they have always been prominent in Cherokee politics.
 
About two years ago the three Wickliffe boys were wanted by the officers on a charge of bringing whisky into the Indian Territory and were chased to some extent by the deputies until finally they decided they would not give up to the deputy marshals that were sent out after them. Deputy United States Marshal J.H. Vier was sent out after them about a year ago and he had no sooner arrived in the neighborhood of the outlaws than he was fired upon by the Wickliffes from ambush and killed.
 
Heavily armed officers are hurrying from all parts of the territory to the scene where the Wickliffe outlaws at last reports were still battling with the two remaining officers. According to the report received here the full blood Indians are going to the support of the Wickliffes, who are Cherokee Indians.
 
Marshal Darrough has wired the Department of Justice at Washington asking authority to swear in 100 additional deputies and to offer $1,000 reward for each of the outlaws, dead or alive.
 
*Ada Evening News, March 13, 1906
Arrive For Trial
Eleven prisoners arrived Monday afternoon from the Ardmore jail in custody of Office Deputy Riley, preparatory to trial at this term of court. All others awaiting trial are out under bond.
 
Ada Evening News, March 15, 1906
The Cherokee Outlaws Are Still At Large
Vinita IT March 15 - United States Marshal William H. Darrough came to this place from the Spavinaw Hills last night and ordered all of his forces out of the Spavinaw country and disbanded them. Mr. Darrough brought with him seven full blood Indians and placed them in the federal jail here tonight on charge of conspiracy for harboring and feeding the Wickliffe[sic] band of outlaws. The forces to be sent after the bandits will be reorganized here and the reorganized forces from the marshal's office will again enter the Spavinaw Hills in an effort to run down the outlaws and capture them. The Indians are having stomp dances. The Night Hawks are telling their people that they will get their laws back and exciting them all they can. They have already had two dances this week but Mr. Darrough thinks that the Night Hawks will not join the bandits, that while they and all other full bloods are in sympathy with the Wickliffes, yet they will not join them and resist the government. Mr. Darrough fears that outlaws from other parts of the country will join these bandits and go out on a career of robbing. The Wickliffes have a wilderness forty miles wide in places and 100 miles long to hide in and they are among their friends, the full blood Cherokees. It is now known that the outlaws number over twelve men. Capt. Gideon S. White, who will operate from Spavinaw against the bandits, has had much experience in this kind of work and it is believed that he will select only such men as he can trust, and who have had experience in the work, and who are well acquainted with the Spavinaw Hills.
 
Ada Evening News, March 20, 1906
Back To Wewoka
Deputy U.S. Marshall John Cordell came down Monday night from Wewoka after Ed Franks who was arrested in Ada yesterday by the local officers and is wanted in the Western district on a charge of whisky peddling. The officer left today with his prisoner.
 
*Ada Evening News, March 20, 1906
Deputy U.S. Marshal Milton was here from Wewoka today.
 
Ada Evening News, March 24, 1906
Outlaws Still Elude
Oaks, I.T. March 24, - Word received here indicates that the three Wickliff[sic] Indian outlaws who are being sought by numerous posses crossed the Illinois River the night following the fight and are heading for Less Creek, a wild mountainous country west of Stillwell, settled almost entirely with full-blooded Cherokees. If this proves true, the outlaws have a long start. Marshal Darrough yesterday moved his camp from Spavinaw Hills to Illinois River.
 
Ada Evening News, March 26, 1906
Death of Mrs. Chapman
After a long, lingering illness of consumption Mrs. Will Chapman, wife of the jailer, died in Ada Sunday. Funeral services were conducted Monday morning at the home by Rev. J.A. Williams, after which the remains were taken to Old Stonewall for interment in the family burial ground.
 
Ada Evening News, March 26, 1906
Begin The Last Weeks' Grind Of U.S. Court
Monday afternoon the officers of the U.S. court reassembled at the court room for the last week's grind of the term. At the hour of going to press little had been disposed of beyond some orders in civil causes. Decrees of divorce, in accordance with reports of the Master in Chancery, were granted the plaintiffs in the following cases: Allie McDonald vs. F.S. McDonald; Calvin C. Perry vs. Eva C. Perry; Annie McAbee vs. Burt McAbee; J.S. Sweat v. Morray Sweat; Maggie Bird vs. F.B. Bird. In the case of John Cunningham, charged with larceny, the defendant not appearing, his bond was forfeited. The trial of Lee Minix for aggravated assault was commenced. He is accused of having last September assaulted with a weapon E.W. Westfall near Dolberg.
 
*Ada Evening News, March 26, 1906
Quadruple Tragedy Is Result Of Fence Feud
Pauls Valley, I.T., March 26 - As the result of a shooting which took place two miles from Maysville, about fifteen miles from this place, a man named Mullens and G.W. Dean are dead, Mart Anderson shot twice in the neck and back and in a very serious condition, a man named Meeks is severely wounded.
Jim Martin of this place and his sons were arrested shortly after the trouble occurred by Deputy United States Marshal Webb and taken to Purcell for a preliminary trial on a charge of doing the killing. The trouble, according to the best reports obtainable, was the result of a fence placed across a road. Mullens fell at the first shot and Dean, though severely wounded, did not die until the afternoon. Mart Anderson is in a precarious condition, but it is thought Meeks will recover.
 
Ada Evening News, March 30, 1906
T.E. Brents Resigns
In today's mail to Marshal Porter at Muskogee there was an official envelope from the Ada office bearing the resignation of T.E. Brents as office deputy at this point. This action, says Mr. Brents has been under his consideration for some time, but not until today did he act upon it, not withstanding the report that such had been done some weeks ago. What he will engage in is no known. He has several propositions before him but has not fully decided as to which he will elect.
 
Ada Evening News, March 31, 1906
Deputy U.S. Marshal John Chapman went to Stonewall today.
 
Ada Evening News, March 31, 1906
Brents Will Remain
Friends of Office Deputy U.S. Marshal Ed Brents, who sent in his resignation last week, will be gratified to learn that he received Sunday from Marshal Porter a telegram urging him to reconsider and retain the deputyship. This, it is reported, Brents has consented to do. He having gone to Ardmore last night, the reporter was unable to get the information at first hand.
 
Ada Evening News, March 31, 1906
From Jug To Gutter
Office Deputy U.S. Marshal Ed Brents celebrated his resignation Friday by seizing a suspicious looking trunk at the Frisco. After pulling out an interesting assortment of ladies and babies garments he came to three jugs of genuine red liquor. The contraband beverage was taken to the court house and the customary libation was poured upon the old curbstone altar.
 
Ada Evening News, March 31, 1906
Prisoner "Throwed A Fit"
Will Buchanan, the Sulphur jointist accused of touching a patron of his place for $200, was held by the U.S. Commissioner to await the action of the grand jury. He failed to make the required $1,500 bond for appearance and was transported Sunday night to the Ardmore jail by Deputy U.S. Marshal Chapman. Enroute to the station the prisoner was seized with a violent fit and fell against a box car sustaining some injuries on the head.
 
Ada Evening News, April 4, 1906
Shot Him And Hiked
In regard to the shooting down southeast eight miles Monday night, which was meagerly reported in Tuesday's News, Deputy U.S. Marshal Chapman has returned from the scene of the trouble which he describes as follows: He found in Davis' railroad camp one Joe Burdick, seriously shot in the side. The man who shot him, Will Kirkland, has disappeared to parts unknown. All those living at the camp appeared to be in sympathy with Kirkland, so it was hard to learn anything further than that ill feeling had existed between the two men for some time, and at the time of the shooting the two were engaged in a kind of a mutual combat. It is thought the wounded man will recover.
 
Ada Evening News, April 4, 1906
Apprehended At Last
Froman Perry (colored) was arrested Tuesday over on Sandy by officers Brents and Chapman. He is accused of having stolen a horse way back last summer, but is said to have been on the scout, and has just recently been located.
 
Ada Evening News, April 5, 1906
Officers Busy
The U.S. Marshal's Office in Ada was about deserted for a while Thursday. Office Deputy Brents was on an official mission to Shawnee, Cummings to Ardmore, Chapman to Stonewall, and Morris to Roff.
 
Ada Evening News, April 6, 1906
Fatal Shooting Among Fullbloods At Ahloso
John Anderson, a full blood Indian, lies dead near Ahloso, six miles southeast of Ada, with two bullet holes through his body, one in the head and one in the trunk, each taking effect from the rear. He was killed about sundown Saturday, Chalia Harkins and son, Nelson, also full bloods, are in jail at Ada charged with the killing.
 
About ten o'clock Saturday night the Harkins men came to Ada and informed the U.S. Marshal's office of the tragedy. True to typical Indian taciturnity the information they gave was rather meagre[sic]. They deny having done the killing, claiming the deceased was shot rather by accident in the confusion of a general fusillade. The men accompanied Deputy Marshals Brents and Chapman back to the scene where Anderson was found in the condition above described - however he did not die until 4 a.m. Sunday. Under the circumstances the officers could do nothing less than take the father and son in custody and their preliminary trial is set for Wednesday morning.
 
From the somewhat meager and tangled reports these facts have been gleaned: Anderson was the guardian of a 14 year old Indian girl who was recently married to Nelson Harkins according to loose Indian rites. The matter had been aired in the commissioner's court here a few days ago, with the result, however, that the parties were discharged with a lecture on domestic morality by the judge. This trouble had engendered bad blood between members of the two families. It seems that on Saturday afternoon Anderson, together with Amsiah McClean and Jim Colbert, went to the house of Chalis Harkins, in the absence of the Harkins, and administered a severe beating to the girl, and discharged their guns promiscuously about the premises. Later the Harkins men returned and the other party retreated. It is not certain to what extent the Harks pursued, but a considerable fusillade occurred about three hundred yards from the house, some 15 or 20 shots being fired, and Anderson fell wounded as above described.
 
Ada Evening News, April 7, 1906
Variegated Adventures For The U.S. Officers
Friday and Friday night were busy times for the U.S. Marshal's force. In the afternoon Office Deputy Brents and Constable Morris made a reconnoitering expedition out on the grading line of the Oklahoma Central. From Stebbins camp they brought back three Negroes, thirty gallons of Choctaw beer and three six-shooters - that is the Negroes and pistols were brought in. Two are held on weapon charges and one for a liquor offense. Upon the arrival of the officers promiscuous was the throwing away of guns. One Negro had a neat little Choctaw club house or canteen in operation in a tent and the odor of the nondescript beverage was insistent. Also up on the M.K.&T. the officers, after searching most of the night, bagged one Pruitt on a charge of dealing in alcohol. But Deputy John Chapman had the romantic trip of the day. It seems the last grand jury indicted Mrs. Fay Chambers, accusing her of maintaining a nuisance in the form of a house of prostitution down on east Main. The officers had not located her until yesterday when they learned she had gone to Stonewall. So last night Chapman procured a hand car and thither pumped his way. He easily found the woman wanted and she cheerfully agreed to return with the officers on the rude rolling stock. Accordingly they pumped back to Ada in the night and the fair prisoner now languishes in the bastile in lieu of giving a $500 bond.
 
Ada Evening News, April 16, 1906
Prisoner Had To Swarm
The local jail became so full that it became advisable Monday morning for the officers to arrange for a swarm to the Ardmore prison. Accordingly Officers Cummings and Chapman escorted thither Jess Aikens, Newt. Foster, Bob Jones, J.I. Wright, and Frohman Perry. The first four are held on liquor charges. Perry is accused of having, last summer, stolen a horse from T.W. Ingram near Stonewall. He was arrested near Ada a few days ago and was given a preliminary hearing in U.S. Commissioner's court last Saturday afternoon, which resulted in his being held to await the action of the grand jury.
 
Ada Evening News, April 16, 1906
The Criminal Chronicle
The atmosphere about the courthouse is so full since Saturday of high and bloody crimes that the smaller and more prosaic ones, like whiskey peddling, will scarcely secure the public's attention. However, Deputy Marshal Cummings and Constable Morris went out Sunday night on the war path against bootleggers, in the railroad camps near Center they lay for a suspect. Soon they caught him on his way to his tent with a gunny sack of booze of the "Old Crow" variety. The man now languishes in jail and answers to the name Jess Carrar. Last Saturday Officer Chapman at the place of Perry Lanham near Center took into custody on Leland Morrow, who is wanted at Durant on a charge of seduction. Office Deputy Sexton from that place took the prisoner back to Durant.
 
Ada Evening News, April 19, 1906
Deputy U.S. Marshals Chapman and Cummings took to the Ardmore jail last night the two Harkins men and Jess Carver alleged bootlegger.
 
Ada Evening News, April 19, 1906
Crime Is Certainly On The Increase This Month
The criminal calendar for the month of April in this part of the county is such as to give encouragement to the pessimist who at all times avers crime is on the increase.
The local U.S. marshal's office has been kept on the jump for the whole month. So overworked have been the field deputies that Office Deputy Brents has had to abandon his desk and also take the field. In the eighteen days he himself has apprehended sixteen prisoners. There seems to have been a veritable epidemic of crime, chiefly of the petty class, until the two homicides of last Saturday and Sunday. The new railroad camps are the source of much lawlessness.
Harve Brumley was arrested Tuesday two miles west of Bebee and committed to jail. He is charged with disposing of mortgaged property recently.
The marshal's office is serving subpoenas on witnesses in two notorious cases transferred from here to Pauls Valley and now set for trial on May 29. They are the James R. Williams murder case and the Ord Rich rape case.
 
Ada Evening News, April 21, 1906
Three Indictments For Copeland
Deputy Marshal Chapman rearrested, Saturday Walter Copeland, who shot and wounded the girl at Center some months ago. The grand jury returned three indictments against him. One for assault to kill, one for weapons, and another for disturbance, and raised his bond to a total of $1,600. His friends expect to make the bond this afternoon.
 
Ada Evening News, April 21, 1906
Cashed Another's Money Order
A Negro named Jesse Phillips was arrested at Tyrola Friday night and lodged in the Ada jail. He is wanted in the Choctaw Nation on a charge of obtaining money under false pretenses in that at the town of Owl three days ago he cashed a money order which did not belong to him. Deputy Marshal Bradshaw and Postmaster Barnsdale of Coalgate came up and took the Negro back there today.
 
Ada Evening News, April 21, 1906
Young Man Crushed To Death By Passing Train
Office deputy Marshal Ed Brents received notice early Saturday morning from Scullim[?] that a dead man was found there on the station platform under circumstances indicating foul play. He left on the Frisco to investigate. Later and fuller reports, however, show that the man was run over by a passing cattle or work train some time after midnight. Probably he was trying to get on or off a train. He had evidently been dragged some fifteen feet and his head was frightfully mangled. The dead man is not known at Scullin and there was nothing on the body to identify it. He appears about 21 years old, about 5 feet 9, of sandy complexion, smooth shaved and was dressed in tan boots and blue overalls. From the description some think the deceased Jack Bowers, who used to work at Carney's livery stable here, and later worked at Chickasha. It was later learned that the deceased is a Denison boy, has a sister living in Sulphur and a brother in Denison. The latter came up to Scullin today and took the remains back with him.
 
Ada Evening News, April 28, 1906
Had To Be Helped To Jail
Deputy U.S. Marshal Chapman Friday night escorted to the Ardmore jail one Bill Stanton of Sulphur. For selling liquor Bill was sentenced at last term of court to twenty days confinement in jail. The judge instructed him to return to Sulphur, arrange his affairs and report at the Ardmore office for incarceration the following Monday. This he failed to do, hence the officer's assistance. Bill claims he went to Ardmore once to serve the time, but after taking a reconnoitering stroll around the prison premises, his courage failed him and he hiked back home.

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