[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Ada Evening News
Ada, Pontotoc County, Indian Territory (OK)
January-February 1906

Abstracted / Transcribed by Diron Ahlquist

 

Honor on the Web

None of these newspaper abstracts are free for the taking. Read Terms of Use.

Dividing Line

 *Ada Evening News, January 2, 1906
U.S. Deputy Marshal Ed Brents and "Choctaw" Brown left this afternoon for Muskogee to testify in a criminal case on trial there
 
*Ada Evening News, January 4, 1906
Deputy U.S. Marshal Ed Brents returned from Muskogee Wednesday night. He reports the political atmosphere up there as pretty foul. Every politician encountered had his grip packed and his pockets full of affidavits in readiness to be off to Washington. He says the respectable people of Muskogee consider utterly baseless the charges filed against Soper and Parker.
 
*Ada Evening News, January 6, 1906
U.S. Deputy Marshal Ed Brents and "Choctaw" Brown left this afternoon for Muskogee to testify in a criminal case on trial there.
 
*Ada Evening News, January 15, 1906
Deputy Marshals Brents, Chapman, and Sublett went to Ardmore this forenoon. In their custody there was a Negro named Jack Frohman, arrested on a capias, having failed to pay the fine assessed against him last court for beating his wife.
 
*Ada Evening News, January 16, 1906
Charged With Stealing Two Head Of Horses
A man named McEwin was brought in last night from Stonewall by Officers Cummings and Morris. He is charged with having last week stolen a mare and colt from Dug Colbert near Davis. The officers state that in trying to dispose of the animals and making contradictory statements at Jesse Sunday he excited the suspicions of the officials there who took him in custody and later turned him over to the city marshal of Stonewell. After a tactful sweating by that officer, McEwin confessed his guilt and admitted his correct name, having at first claimed to be named Jackson. Also he later made substantially the same confession to officer Brents, who talked with him over the telephone. The stock awaits the coming of the owner.
 
*Ada Evening News, January 27, 1906
Swiped A Car Of Beer
Deputy Gilstrap of the Northern District recently arrested two men charged with stealing twenty-seven kegs of beer at Westvills, I.T. It is claimed that one of them held the crowd back with a gun while the other removed the "ponies" from a freight car. Somehow these two brave men have the sympathy of all lovers of the foamy beverage who have experienced difficulty in getting hold of even a single bottle of beer in Indian Territory.
 
*Ada Evening News, January 29, 1906
Republican Pow-wow
Deputy Marshals Brents and Cummings left this forenoon for Checotah to attend the meeting of the territorial republican executive committee. There is to be a big banquet tonight and a meeting of the committee Tuesday. U.S. Marshal Colbert and the Ardmore contingent were on the same train.
 
*Ada Evening News, January 29, 1906
Deputy Marshal Sublett left for Marrietta.
 
*Ada Evening News, January 30, 1906
Porter Gets The Plum In Southern District
Washington, Jan. 30 - The President yesterday sent to the Senate the nomination of Grosvenor A. Porter of Muskogee, I.T., for U.S. Marshal of the Southern District of Indian Territory. Thus is ended the long suspense and numerous speculations concerning the appointment for that office. Porter is a cousin of Mrs. Roosevelt.
Also it was given out at the White House that the President would appoint his picturesque friend, John Abernathy, marshal for the District of Oklahoma.
 
*Ada Evening News, January 30, 1906
Bank At Talihina Touched For $2,000
Talihina, I.T., Jan. 20 - The First National Bank at this place was burglarized at 2 o'clock yesterday morning. The safe was blown and the contents taken except about $700, which was evidently overlooked. About $2,000 was secured. The robbers shot twice at a man who was attempting to give the alarm and drove him into the house. The building and fixtures were considerably damaged. The cracksmen secured a crowbar and other tools from the railway shops, and also piled a quantity of baled hay about the building. There is practically no clew to the robbers, though Deputy Marshal J.E. Emmert and posse are now making a determined effort to trace them. The bank was insured.
 
*Ada Evening News, January 31, 1906
Deputy Marshal Brents got out of his sick bed today to go [sic] Pauls Valley. He was taken ill enroute to Checotah Monday and had to return home. Deputy Chapman accompanied him to Pauls Valley.
 
Ada Evening News, January 31, 1906
Bob Cummings came home last night from Checotah where he attended the meeting of the republican executive committee. He said they had a great time and marvelous harmony prevailed.
 
Ada Evening News, February 5, 1906
Officer Sublett came over from Ardmore Saturday and departed today for Pauls Valley.
 
Ada Evening News, February 5, 1906
Ed Brents got home from a court trip to Pauls Valley Sunday.
 
The New Marshal's Regime
By the last of this week A.K.[sic] Porter recently appointed U.S. marshal for this district, will likely assume his official duties and select his deputies. His appointment is expected to be confirmed by the Senate Tuesday. In all there are fifty-three deputies to be named in this district. Those who have talked with Mr. Porter say he is not disposed to make any sweeping changes in the personnel of the force. In case local fights over deputyships should arise, and the filing of charges and mud-slinging began, it is reported that Mr. Porter will simply import old frontier friends - and good official timber withal - from far-off Wyoming. But this he will not do, it is said, unless petty factional fights force it. It is to be hoped that the Southern District will be spared the spectacle of further political dirt-tossing, such as characterized the recent contests for appointments at Washington, and that Mr. Porter can consistently select capable subordinates from home material.
 
Ada Evening News, February 8, 1906
Another Continuance For Colbert's Case
Ardmore, I.T., Feb. 8 - Witnesses in the B.H. Colbert case are being notified by the government not to appear at Tishomingo on Feb. 12, the date recently set for the trial of the tribal warrant cases. The United States District Attorney today states that a motion would be made on the opening day of court for a continuance of the cases, for the reason that the government will not be ready to try them. It was stated that the government wishes to investigate certain matters in connection with the cases and needs additional time. District Attorney Walker says the cases will not be dismissed. A number of the witnesses reside in St. Louis and Joplin and Texas.
 
Ada Evening News, February 8, 1906
Another Rough Rider
The editor notes among the list of deputy appointments by the new marshal, G.A. Porter, that of his old rough rider acquaintance, John Hammer, to a clerkship worth $1,600 per annum. John was the best cook in the regiment and a scrapper from way back. This we know by personal experience, having met him on the bloody field of battle - within the confines of the regimental camp.
 
Ada Evening News, February 8, 1906
Porter Announces Some Appointments
Grosvenor A. Porter of the union agency, whose appointment as U.S. Marshal of the Southern district of the Indian Territory was yesterday confirmed by the senate, will assume charge of the office as B.H. Colbert's successor at once.
Mr. Porter has decided upon the following appointments in his official family:
Clarence McKion of Muskogee, chief deputy, salary $2,500 a year.
A.R. Cottle of Muskogee, in charge of the civil docket, salary $1,300.
Jack Riley of Muskogee, $1,300
S.J. Hammer of Ardmore, and a son of ex-U.S. Marshal John S. Hammer of the Southern District at a salary of $1,600.
R. Herz of Ardmore, and at present an employe[sic] of the marshal's office salary $1,200
Mr. Porter announced to a Democrat man that there would be but few changes in field deputies.
"I intend to retain all the Southern district men that I can," said Mr. Porter.
Mr. Porter will have thirty deputies, including office deputies, to appoint and in addition there will be eight jailers, nine jail guards, a matron and a cook.
The new marshal is swamped with applications for appointment.
-Muskogee Democrat
 
Ada Evening News, February 12, 1906
Duel To The Death In Blacksmith Shop
Shawnee, Okla., Feb. 12 - Saturday evening at Maud, in this county, Tom Dancer, city marshal, was fatally shot and Vic Chambers, a blacksmith, was killed. Dancer, who is under bond for stabbing a white man and who later killed a Negro there, had been across the Seminole line suppressing some gambling and as he returned Chambers, who was drinking, called him into the blacksmith shop and asked whether Dancer had called one of his (Chambers') relatives a name. Dancer replied that he had and meant it, when Chambers fired twice, striking the marshal in vital spots. Dancer replied with two shots, one entering Chambers' head and causing instant death. Parties who saw the terrible duel exonerate Dancer from blame. He has been a terror to the criminals who infest the little border town and has often been in danger of death.
 
Ada Evening News, February 13, 1906
Judge Winn and Constable Morris went to Roff to hold Commissioner's Court today.
 
Ada Evening News, February 19, 1906
O.E. Collins, city marshal of Roff, was in town over night.
 
Ada Evening News, February 19, 1906
Marshal's Force Reappointed
A telegram received in Ada Monday afternoon announces that the entire old force of U.S. deputy marshals for the Ada office have been reappointed by Marshal Porter. So the personnel of the Ada department will continue to be Ed Brents, office deputy; Rbt. Cummings and John Chapman, field deputies; Wm. Chapman, jailor. The news will be very gratifying to the many friends of these gentlemen. Marshal Porter arrived in Ardmore Sunday and was sworn in today. The local deputies were all there and are expected home this afternoon.
 
Ada Evening News, February 19, 1906
Two Men Apprehended For Sasakwa Killing
Muskogee, I.T., Feb. 19 - Deputy Marshal John Cordell of Wewoka has brought to Muskogee Barney Fixico and an Indian known as "Wild Cat", who with several others are charged with the killing of Billy Cully, a prominent Seminole Indian light horse man, five miles west of Sasakwa on the night of Feb. 3. Deputy Marshal Bass Reeves of this city identified "Wild Cat" as an Indian he arrested twenty years ago while he was Deputy United States Marshal at Fort Smith. The jail records substantiate Reeves. The officer was sent to the territory to arrest "Wild Cat" and while on his way escaped and this is the first time the officers have seen him since. It was thought the man dead long ago.
 
Ada Evening News, February 20, 1906
Marshals Office Resumes Business
After ten days of inactivity and suspense in the Ada office of the U.S. Marshal, caused by the change of marshals for the Southern District, business was resumed in full blast Tuesday morning to prepare for the March term of court. Office Deputy Brents and Chapman returned Monday afternoon from Ardmore with their commissions of reappointment. The new marshal, G.A. Porter, reappointed the entire old force of deputies, save four or five who had to be displaced for close friends of his. This, notwithstanding new applications were numerous, and there was considerable filing of charges against old incumbents.
 
Ada Evening News, February 21, 1906
Deputy Marshal Chapman went to Stonewall.
 
*Ada Evening News, February 21, 1906
More Pie For Muskogee
Ardmore, Feb. 2 - It is announced that Clarence G. McKoin will be chief deputy to Marshal A.G. Porter of the Southern District. McKoin is employed by the Government at Muskogee.
 
Ada Evening News, February 24, 1906
Constable Eli Morris returned last night from Sulphur, where he spent a busy week in official work. He says Sulphur is becoming an important point for court business.
 
Ada Evening News, February 26, 1906
Court At Stonewall
This Monday is regular commissioner's court day at Stonewall. Judge Winn, Constable Morris, and Attorney J.F. McKeel went down for the monthly grind.
 
Ada Evening News, February 27, 1906
Deputy Marshal Brents went to Tishomingo on court business.
 
Ada Evening News, February 28, 1906
Deputy Marshal Ed Brents returned home from an official trip to Tishomingo.
 
Ada Evening News, February 28, 1906
The "Uno" Reform
Vinita, I.T., Feb. 28 - The Uno reform for the Indian Territory that struck Muskogee some time ago has at last reached the Northern district of the Indian Territory. United States District Attorney Wade. S. Stanfield swore out a warrant before United States Commissioner Thomas J. Fears, charging A.J. Michael with selling intoxicating liquor in the Indian Territory. Michael has been selling Uno in Vinita. Mr. Michael will proceed under a writ of habeas corpus in the United States court and will in this way bring the Uno question directly before the federal authorities for a decision as to whether it is intoxicating and contains enough alcohol to bring it under the ban prescribed by Mellette, at Muskogee. A great many people here will testify that they drank Uno and it never had any intoxicating effect upon them. The case will be an interesting one and its final outcome will be watched with interest.

Dividing Line

Next Section - Law Enforcement Index - Newspaper Index - Home Page

[an error occurred while processing this directive]